What defines a best airline?

What defines a best airline, considering the different surveys that rank them? Conde Nast Travel has just released its readers’ choice of the best in 2017, and it is no surprise the list is made up of Asian, Middle East, European and SW Pacific carriers.

Courtesy Air New Zealand

Of course, it depends on the readership, but recognizing that, it also points to what really makes these airlines stand out. It is clear that the premium class service weighs heavily – the seat comfort and the fine food.

Etihad Airways (ranked #16) offers “the future of first-class comfort: a three-room “residence” with a bedroom, private bath with shower, and lounge.” Emirates (#4) offers “posh perks for premium fliers – cocktail lounges, in-flight showers… part of the reason it scores so high among travellers.” And the suites on Singapore Airlines (#3) offer “a pair of fully flat recliners that can be combined into a double bed.”

Mention is made of the premium economy class in almost all the ranked airlines” KLM (#20), Lufthansa (#19), Japan Airlines (#17), All Nippon Airways (#13), Qantas (#12), Cathay Pacific (#10), Virgin Atlantic (#7), Virgin Australia (#6), Singapore Airlines (#3) and Air New Zealand (#1).

So it may appear to be the voice of the premium travellers that is being heard. Maybe coach travellers aren’t too concerned about the ranking, more driven by price and less frilly factors, although to be fair, the Conde Nast report did mention of at least one airline, i.e. Etihad Airways (#16), not ignoring “those sitting in the back.” While many travellers may resign to the belief that the economy class is about the same across the industry, it is reasonable to assume that an airline that strives to please its customers in the front cabins will most probably carry that culture or at least part of it to the rear.

Although you may draw consensus across many of the surveys, it is best best to treat each one of them in isolation. It is more meaningful to try and draw intra conclusions within the findings of the particular survey.

You will note in the Conde Nast findings, there is an absence of American (including Canadian) carriers, never mind that of African and South American carriers.

Asiana Airlines (#8) is ranked ahead of Korean Air (#11).

All Nippon Airways (#13) is ranked ahead of Japan Airlines (#17). V

Virgin Australia (#6) is ranked ahead of Qantas (#12).

The order of the “Big 3” Gulf carriers is as follows: Qatar Airways (#2), Emirates (#4) and Etihad Airways (#16).

Of European carriers, there is the conspicuous absence of the big names of British Airways (compare Virgin Atlantic #7) and Air France, and the pleasant surprise of Aegean Airlines (#9) while SWISS seems to be regaining its erstwhile status years ago as being the industry standard.

The best belongs to Air New Zealand as the quiet achiever.

Ultimately, the results also depend on the group of respondents whose experiences may be limited to certain airlines.

Other airlines ranked in the top 20 of the Conde Nast survey: Finnair (#14), Turkish Airlines (#15), EVA Air (#18).

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What Qantas’ strategy shift means for Changi, SIA

http://www.todayonline.com/commentary/what-qantas-strategy-shift-means-changi-sia

Big Mess at Ryanair

Courtesy Getty Images

The world’s biggest budget airline has found itself floundering in a big mess. An apaprent mistake in leave schedulign of pilots as it claimed has led the airline to cancel 2,100 flights over six weeks until November – 40 to 50 flights a day. That means inconveniencing some some 300,000 customers who would receive or had already received emails informing them of the cancellations.

Ryanair said it would arrange alternative flights or refund the fares. Under the European Passenger Rights legislation, passengers are entitled to compensation for flight cancellations. Ryanair estimates it will cost the carrier 20m euros (US$24m).

The unpredented slew of cancellations may also subject Ryanair to penalties imposed by the authorities. Italy’s competition regulator – Italian Competition and Market Authority – has started a probe into the matter, on whether the cancellations could have been prevented. It is hard to believe that Ryanair had nto anticipated the problem and, if found guilty, could be fined as much as 5m euros.

Ryanair chose to cancel flights first at its busiest airports so that it would be eassier to arrange alternative flights. But, of course, in the mess of events, this has a knock-on effect.

Ryanair chief Michael O’Leary denied the airline was experieicning a shortage of pilots, even as many as 140 of them have left to join new rival Norwegian Air Shuttle. Mr O’Leary insisted it was because the airline had “messed up” the rosters which left it without enough pilots to operate all the scheduled flights.

One thing for sure, Ryanair will certainly feel the heat of the competition brought on by Norwegian and other carriers such as EasyJet, if advanced bookings for October at 70 per cent comapred to September at 90 per cent are any indications.

Will this mess cause Ryanair any further loss of customers in the future? The airline has a dotted history of going from zero customer service to attempting improving that aspect in the face of rising competition. Much depends on how it handles the current crisis. In a price sensitive market, people’s memories tend to be short while most people are actually more forgiving than expected under the circumstances. The real threat for Ryanair remains the competition particularly if the rivals are seen to be more reliable.

EasyJet to shake up market

Courtesy EasyJet

EasyJet “will shake up the market,” said the low-cost carrier’s chief commercial officer Peter Duffy. The airline operating out of London Gatwick has entered into an arrangement with Norwegian Air Shuttle and WestJet to allow booking of connecting flights to Singapore and destinations in North America that include New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and Toronto on its website.

This is another indication of how LCCs are no longer content with just the so-called niche market as they enter into the arena of the big boys. Such connections are usually forged among legacy airlines competing with each other, an advantage compared to stand-alone LCCs confined to point-to-point traffic. So EasyJet’s initiative – said to be the first global airline connections service by a European low fares carrier – is set to change the rules of the game.

Already Norwegian, encouraged by the prospect of an increased number of passengers through the partnership that will help it expand its wings, is talking about the possibility of linking up with Ryanair. EasyJet also said the tripartite arrangement will expand to include more airlines.

The agreement is not completely an LCC club as it includes WestJet, Canada’s second largest airline after Air Canada. This is breaking new ground, challenging the advantage enjoyed by legacy airlines which are supported by subsidiary or joint-venture LCCs, among them Lufthansa/Eurowings, British Airways/Level/Vueling, Qantas/JetStar, and Singapore Airlines/Scoot.

It is interesting how the modus operandi of the LCC keeps evolving, and consumers stand to benefit from the increased competition. For now, EasyJet customers connecting partner flights will have to collect their bags in transit, to be handled via the Gatwick Connects desk in the baggage reclaim area. No reason why this will not improve in time.

Pay if you want to pick up or drop off a passenger at the airport

IT looks like you may have to think twice about getting dropped off or picked up at the airport in your private vehicle if you’re not prepared to pay for the privilege. Some airports in Britain are already ringing the cash register for this, and the gUK government is keen to spread the net wider.

Now Boston’s Logan International Airport in the United States may follow suit as it initiates a study on such a plan. Echoing the UK authorities, the Massachusetts Port Authority which owns Logan Airport cited enviromental concerns about emissions by too many vehicles going to the airport. In fact, Dallas/Fort Worth Internaitonal Airport in Texas charges vehicles for entering the airport precinct, as a deterrent to drivers who may be using it as a shortcut connecting highways.

Be that as the primary objective, such a scheme is no doubt a revenue source as well. But be that resultant benefit to the authorities as only incidental, such a policy will help relieve congestion at the airport faced with the problem of haphazard parking to pick up or drop off passengers, and drivers flouting the rule of waiting time restrictions, particularly when they wish to avoid paying exorbitant carpark fees.

Some airports provide a complimentary shuttle service between terminal buildings and off-airport carparks to discourage drivers heading to terminal kerbsides and congesting the access road. Vancouver International Airport has a cellphone waiting/parking area where drivers will wait until they receive a call alerting them that their arriving guests are ready to be picked up. (See Why Vancouver International is North America’s best airport, Feb 24, 2015)

Ultimately the aim is to encourage more reliance on public transport. But unless this is readily available and accessible, convenient and not too expensive, travellers and their well-wishers or send-off party are unlikely to be satisfied with the paying scheme and may even try to find ways to get round it. Fortunately, in addition to public buses, most modern airports are linked by the subway train, which is a boon to travellers. However, few cities operate services round the clock 24/7 even as their airports are served by flights arriving or departing in the wee hours.

After the merger of Scoot and Tigerair, will it be Singapore Airlines and SilkAir next?

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Will Singapore Airlines (SIA) and its subsidiary SilkAir take the merger route of Scoot and Tigerair, now that their finance operations are merged, perhaps as a first step in that direction?

While SIA maintains that such initiatives are part of an ongoing programme to be more competitive, the speculation is only to be expected in the oontext of the company embarking on “a comprehensive review that leaves no stone unturned, cutting across all divisions of the company” as stated by its CEO Goh Choon Phong.

SlkAir started in 1975 as Tradewinds Charters which became Tradewinds Airlines in 1989 when scheduled services were introduced. Three years later, it was renamed SilkAir, shedding its leisure image and is often referenced as SIA’s regional arm.

However, in its long history, SilkAir hardly comes into its own, seen as operating in the shadow of parent SIA. Therefore, consolidating operations – finance, for a start – makes sense since some of the routes operated by SilkAir were previously operated by SIA and in light of SIA re-focussing its operations in the region. Besides, as the competition intensifies, a strong SIA brand across the region is imperative. There is no reason why a regional carrier so-called should be viewed as one providing services one notch below, an unfortunate perception that is difficult to shed.

At the height of the budget travel boom in the region, SIA launched Tigerair in 2003. Then there were already questions asked about the continuing operations of SilkAir which the company reiterated is a regional airline and not a budget carrier. Then Scoot came into being in 2012 as a medium haul budget carrier, differentiated from Tigerair’s short haul operations. It soon became clear the SIA Group was having one too many on its plate, resulting in intra-competition. Tigerair and Scoot finally merged under the Scoot brand this year.

Now that the number has been trimmed from four to three, will it be cut down further to two, typically the structure of most global airlines, between full-service and low-cost operations?

SilkAir may be likened to Cathay Dragonair, which Cathay Pacific has also insisted is not a budget but regional airline. But then, Cathay has never believed in adding a budget carrier under its wings. You might say that place is filled by Dragonair. By comparison, however, SilkAir’s status is somewhat ambiguous depending on how SIA delineates the geography as being regional or international.

Qantas continues to fly high

Courtesy Getty Images

Qantas reported another good year ending June 30, 2017. The Australian flag carrier posted a profit of A$852 million (US$67.4 million) – its second highest in the airline’s 97-year history – although it declined by 17.2 per cent compared to last year’s A$1.03 billion.

The question to ask is how Qantas manages to turn in stellar performances when rivals such as Cathay Pacific and Singapore Airlines (SIA) are dipping into losses? Cathay lost HK$585 million (US$103 million) in 2016, and SIA incurred a loss of S$41 million (US$29 million) in Q4 of FY2016/17. (See Cathay Pacific axes 800 jobs: Is this the answer? May 27, 2017)

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce points to the success of the Transformation Program introduced three years ago. The program is now complete with all targets met on time, having achieved asignificant improvement in financial performance, record customer advocacy and record employee engagement. Consequently the airline has incorporated a culture of transformation and continuous improvement goin forward.

“We operate in a very competitive environment, so continuous improvement is crucial,” said Mr Joyce.

The star performer is Qantas Domestic, advantaged by the booming domestic market. It earns an operating margin of 11.5 per cent on revenue of A$5.63 billion. With 90 per cent of the market, it is far ahead of its rival Virgin Australia.

Record earnings were also reported by the Jetstar Group with an operating margin of 11.6 per cent on revenue of A$3.60 billion. Outside Australia, these include Jetstar operations based in Singapore, Japan and Vietnam. The failure to set up base in Hong Kong as a consequence of protest from Cathay and Hong Kong Airlines has not stopped the budget carrier from growing.

Qantas International which used to be the bane of the airline’s financial performance has plowed back into the black in spite of the stiff competition it faces. It posted an operating margin of 5.7 per cent on revenue of A$5.70 billion.

Qantas’ Asian strategy that saw increased capacity to key Asian destinations has proven to be well-timed and placed. The airline will be increasing international capacity by 5 per cent in the first half of FY2017/18, mainly to desinations in the the growing Asian market.

Farther down the road, the airline plans to fly non-stop from Sydney to London and New York by 2022 subject to the availability of aircraft that can travel those long distances. In the near term, Qantas will be flying direct from Perth to London next year. This, said Mr Joyce,“is a huge leap forward” for the flying kangaroo.

Indeed, and it is likely to change the game somewhat, affecting not only would-be erstwhile transit points and competing off-shore airlines which must perforce make those stops. All the more so will airlines now find the need to be creative in influencing the traveller’s preference and enhancing brand loyalty in their marketing effort.