Grim future for airlines: Is consolidation the answer?

ACCORDING to Qantas CEO Alan Joyce, the airline industry faces an overcrowding problem. At the recent International Air Transport Association (Iata) summit in Beijing, he said: “The number of airlines in the industry is too many. It’s too fragmented, and consolidation is a good thing.”

Mr Joyce is re-championing an old strategy that more than 20 years ago was predicted to inevitably see the number of competitors reduced to a few mega airlines. One suspects that Qantas, struggling with a money-losing international operation, is crying foul over the competition posed by better-geared airlines that also provide superior customer service such as Emirates and Singapore Airlines (SIA),

Not foreseen then was the impending flourish of budget carriers, which became more than just a temporary nuisance but a threat to the more established airlines like Qantas. Qantas would meet with more competition when Scoot, a new budget subsidiary of SIA, commences services between Singapore and Sydney.

The recent spate of new mergers, particularly of giants like British Airways/Iberia, Air France/KLM, Continental/United and Delta/Northwest, seems to suggest a return to a strategy that was a bitter pill for SIA to swallow when it bought stakes in Virgin Atlantic in 1999 and Air New Zealand in 2000. The Virgin stake was a not-so-glamorous-after-all marriage which SIA has for some time now indicated interest in dissolution if it could find a suitable buyer. The Air NZ marriage turned out to be a fiasco, and was subsequently dissolved at a loss. That perhaps explains a more cautionary approach that SIA seems to be adopting today, preferring a less binding collaborative relationship such as the commercial arrangement  inked with Virgin Australia.

Consolidation is expected to come with the merits of sharing costs and risks, and the hope of confining, reducing or eliminating competition. In the present climate, cost is likely to be the primary driver in this direction. The LATAM merger, made up of Chile’s LAN and Brazil’s TAM, is expected to save US$700 million in operating costs over four years.

Unity is strength, but a good marriage demands more than just an exchange of vows, particularly when it crosses culture and geography, when it is held together by unequal strengths, and when both parties uphold different management ideologies. Qantas itself went through that rough patch with British Airways, which outbid SIA for a 25-per-cent stake in the Australian flag carrier in 1993, then ending the partnership in 2004. In 2008, rumours resurfaced of a possible Qantas-BA merger that never did materialize.

Yet as circumstances change, with the global economy continuing to languish and fuel prices remaining volatile, joining forces and leveraging on each other’s advantages in whatever form may provide the stabilizer in stormy weather.

Advertisements

About David Leo
David Leo has more than 30 years of aviation experience, having served in senior management in one of the world's best airlines and airports. He continues to maintain a keen interest in the business, writes freelance and provides consultancy services in the field.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: