KLM advances green effort

Courtesy Boeing

Courtesy Boeing

KLM last week becomes the first airline to operate a regular weekly transatlantic flight, using an eco-friendly fuel mix of 25 per cent Dutch airline cooking oil and 75 per cent jet fuel.

The cooking oil, which comes from restaurant wastes, is able to reduce carbon emissions by up to 80 per cent. This is noteworthy, considering that aviation is responsible for 2 per cent of global emissions, and that number continues to grow.  

Captain Rick Shouten, who piloted KLM’s maiden transAtlantic biofuel flight from Amsterdam’s Schiphol to New York’s JFK, told the New York Post: “For pilots, it’s totally transparent. It’s as if you’re flying a normal aircraft.”

Back in Jun 2011, KLM too was the first airline to operate the world’s first commercial biofuel flight when it carried 171 passengers from Amsterdam to Paris, also using cooking oil. It was a major step forward in the green pursuit. Since then, a number of airlines have powered either test flights or commercial flights using a mix of jet fuel and plant alternatives that include jatropha, algae, camelina, carinata, coconut and babassu.

The list of airlines championing the green effort include Virgin Atlantic (which flew the first biofuel test flight from London to Amsterdam), AeroMexico, Air Canada, Air China, Air France, Air New Zealand, Alaska Airlines, Continental Airlines, Etihad Airways, Finnair, Brazil’s GOL, Iberia, Interjet, Japan Airlines, Lufthansa, Canada’s Porter Airlines, TAM, Thomson Airways and United Airlines.

However, still in its infancy stage, biofuel is expensive, and may cost as much as three times the price of regular jet fuel. “A lot still has to happen before biofuel will be available on a large scale and for it to be economically competitive in relation to fossil-fuel kerosene,” said KLM. “We cannot achieve this alone. We absolutely need the commitment and support of all the relevant parties: business, government and society.”

For it to be sustainable there has to be cheaper refining methods and widespread use across the industry. Support from national agencies at this stage is imperative, if only because saving the environment is everybody’s business.

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About David Leo
David Leo has more than 30 years of aviation experience, having served in senior management in one of the world's best airlines and airports. He continues to maintain a keen interest in the business, writes freelance and provides consultancy services in the field.

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