Boeing blues

Three months after the grounding of the B787-Dreamliner and while Boeing struggles to resolve the issue to get the plane back up in the sky, a new problem has landed on its lap – this time, concerning the B737 jets. The US Federal Aviation Administration has issued an airworthiness directive for more than 1,000 B737 planes operating in its airspace (which also applies in Canada) to be inspected for faulty tail pins that may have prematurely corroded, causing pilots to lose control of the plane.

The FAA said: “We are issuing this AD to prevent premature failure of the attach pins, which could cause reduced structural integrity of the horizontal stabilizer to fuselage attachment, resulting in loss of control of the airplane.”

It is a precautionary move, but likely a costly one for the airlines that have a large number of the B737 jets in their fleet, such as WestJet Airlines of Canada. Since the B737 is a short to medium-range aircraft, it is likely that regional airlines including cargo operators are likely to be the most affected. But safety is not something that you can or want to downplay in the business of flying.

This could not have come at a worse time upon the heel of a Lion Air crash into the waters, short landing at Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport in Indonesia just this week. Fortunately all passengers survived. There was no connection between the incident and FAA’s directive – the way that the grounding of the B787-Dreamliner was consequent upon sparks aboard a Japan Airlines plane initially suspected to be caused by the lithium-ion battery pack – and investigators have yet to establish the cause. It might even be extraneous to Boeing. Lion Air, which is Indonesia’s second largest airline and one of the fastest growing in the region, is banned from operating within the US and European Union over safety concerns.

Photo: Reuters/Stringer Indonesia

Photo: Reuters/Stringer Indonesia

But what came across as frightfully familiar was how the fuselage of the Lion Air plane broke apart, recalling similar mishaps experienced by four other airlines that include Continental Airlines in 2008, American Airlines in 2009, Aires Airlines (Colombia) in 2010 and Caribbean Airlines in 2011. Mind you, the B737 has been around since the 1960s and is a favourite plane for regional flights. It is in fact the best selling jet in the history of aviation.

Boeing will have much to do to repair its image. The aircraft business is dominated by two players – Boeing itself and Airbus, and the competition is such that for the bigger jets, the decision to buy which make and model usually comes down to either one of them. Aircraft orders can span several years, and timing is important.

Then, of course, as things settle, there is the looming question of compensation for downtime if Boeing is found to be contributory to its customer airlines losing out on opportunities. At least one airline – Qatar Airways – affected by the grounding of the B787-Dreamliner has publicly announced it will seek compensation from Boeing. Qatar chairman Akbar Al Baker said: “Definitely we will demand compensation. We are not buying airplanes from them to put in a museum.”

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About David Leo
David Leo has more than 30 years of aviation experience, having served in senior management in one of the world's best airlines and airports. He continues to maintain a keen interest in the business, writes freelance and provides consultancy services in the field.

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