AirAsia blames ANA for budget break-up

Courtesy Wikipedia Commons/Flickr

Courtesy Wikipedia Commons/Flickr

AirAsia chief Tony Fernandes has put the blame on All Nippon Airways (ANA) for the breakup of AirAsia Japan budget joint-venture. (See Budget business matures, Jun 12, 2013) The beef is that majority shareholder ANA as a full-service airline does not understand budget operations, giving rise to differences between the two partners in financial and management issues.

A marriage across cultures is not always an easy one, even if both partners hail from the same level. The aviation industry has seen the break-up of even the most likely partners. Ultimately it all comes down to the numbers. AirAsia Japan is not doing as well as the other budget operators, namely ANA’s other budget arm Peach Aviation with a Hong Kong partner and Jetstar Japan, a joint-venture between Qantas’ Jetstar and Japan Airlines (JAL) as major partners.

How then do you explain Peach and Jetstar being more successful? Mr Fernandes may argue that it is because Peach’s other partner is non-aviation, so is it a case of too many experts spoiling the broth? And, interestingly, Mr Fernandes said he has learnt one critical lesson from the failed tie-up; he was quoted as having allegedly said: “The lesson is I will never ever work with another airline in my life. Let me qualify that – premium airline.” That again may have also explained why he has chosen to set up AirAsia India with non-aviation partners Tata Sons and Amit Bhatia instead of with another airline or buying into an existing airline such as Kingfisher Airlines which is clutching at straws for some help.

What about Jetstar Japan, assuming it has so far not faced the kind of problems that confronted AirAsia Japan, even though JAL, like ANA, is a full-service airline and Jetstar, like AirAsia, operates the no-frills model? Or, if Qantas, instead of Jetstar, is driving the business, does it not augur ill when two full-service airlines try to operate a budget joint-venture along legacy lines? Yet the Jetstar brand has enjoyed good growth across the region.

ANA will now buy up the AirAsia stake in the joint-venture, and AirAsia Japan may then merge with Peach. Since Japan is a prized market for leisure travel, AirAsia may again seek to re-enter the market on its own. Can it do better the next time round? The longer it waits, the more it has to catch up with lost ground as the market matures.

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About David Leo
David Leo has more than 30 years of aviation experience, having served in senior management in one of the world's best airlines and airports. He continues to maintain a keen interest in the business, writes freelance and provides consultancy services in the field.

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