The lure of the budget long-haul dream

THE elusive dream of the budget long haul continues to lure the few venturists who are bold enough to go where others had failed and many would shun, ever since Sir Freddie Laker launched the first such service in 1977. The Laker Airways flight flew from London Gatwick Airport to New York’s JFK Airport, a journey that would take some eight to nine hours, double the conventional budget standard. Laker ceased operations five years later.

It is a bigger dream today, to fly budget long-haul over a greater distance, say, between Europe and Asia.

Notable failures that followed include Hong Kong’s Oasis Airlines that operated services from Hong Kong to London and to Vancouver. It launched its first commercial flight in 2006 and ceased operations two years later. That it was voted “World’s Leading New Airline” at the Annual World Travel Awards in 2007 did little to save it from falling over the edge. A subsidiary of Malaysian budget carrier AirAsia based in Kuala Lumpur, AirAsia X which introduced services from Kuala Lumpur first to London in 2007 and then to Paris had a relatively short run too when it suspended operations in 2012.

Courtesy Norwegian

Courtesy Norwegian


Norwegian Airlines became the latest operator to take up that challenge when it launched thrice-weekly services from London’s Gatwick Airport to Los Angles, to be followed by flights to Fort Lauderdale and New York.

So it looks like what’s in there for pioneer Laker and his followers is but a commendable dash of derring-do!

Not quite the same story for established carriers faced with the stiff competition posed by rivals offering lower fares. Singapore Airlines launched Scoot (which in reality is still very much a short to medium range operator). Air Canada launched Rouge for services from Toronto to the Caribbean and to Europe with its eye also set on Asian destinations. Lufthansa has announced plans to launch similar services to Asia and possibly to Australia as well, packing in more seats in its wide-body jets to lower seat costs which will in turn mean lower fares.

Lufthansa’s CEO Carsten Spohr has taken issue in particular with the competition posed by the Gulf carriers – Emirates Airlines, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways – which, advantaged by lower cost bases and plenty of cash, he alleged, are not competing on a level playing field. But if it is a matter of joining them when you can’t beat them, hopefully to beat them at their game, it is clear that Lufthansa and the like are no longer in command of the market.

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About Dingzi
Writer by passion, with professional expertise in aviation, customer service and creative writing. Aviation veteran, author, editor and management consultant. Besides commentary on business issues and life-interest topics, travel stories and book reviews, genres include fiction, poetry and plays. Nature lover who abhors cruelty of any form to animals, and a tireless traveler. Above all, a dreamer.

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