Budget phobia grips European airlines

Courtesy Getty Images

Courtesy Getty Images

THE strike by German airline Lufthansa’s pilots may be over a different personnel issue, but it reflects similar circumstances faced by Air France (see Air France/Union dispute reflects a divisive and unsure industry, Oct 3, 2014).

European airlines are gripped by budget phobia as both Air France and Lufthansa have blamed the strikes not only for the costly disruption of flights but also for hindering their efforts to effectively compete with the likes of Ryanair and easyJet through their respective subsidiaries, Transavia (Air France) and Germanwings (Lufthansa).

On the one hand, it is an issue of fair employee compensation and welfare, and the integrity of the human resource administration. On the other, it is a matter of survival in the competition that ultimately must address the issue of costs.

The imbroglio can only benefit the budget carriers, as disgruntled travellers switch their allegiance. easyJet announced a windfall riding on the Air France/union dispute, which had boosted its revenue by £5m (US$5.35m) (see Easyjet rides on Air France’s troubles, Oct 8. 2014).

Lufthansa management has offered to retain the pension scheme for employees who joined the company before this year. The scheme allows pilots to retire at age 55 but they will continue to receive up to 60 per cent of their pay before regular pension payments kick in at 65. However, Lufthansa will increase the retirement age for new recruits.

Apparently the pilots union has proposed a plan to cover the costs of retaining the current scheme. It would be interesting to find out what.

The industrial action has cost Lufthansa 70m euros (US$89m). The airline failed to get the court to declare the strikes as illegal, and the Vereinigung Cockpit (VC) union does not rule out further action.

Until the dispute is settled, budget carriers can look forward to a better year-end season as travellers make advance bookings for Christmas and the New Year. easyJet announced it has sold 25 per cent of its seats for the next six months.

Advertisements

About Dingzi
Writer by passion, with professional expertise in aviation, customer service and creative writing. Aviation veteran, author, editor and management consultant. Besides commentary on business issues and life-interest topics, travel stories and book reviews, genres include fiction, poetry and plays. Nature lover who abhors cruelty of any form to animals, and a tireless traveler. Above all, a dreamer.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: