The race to operate the world’s longest non-stop flight

Courtesy Emirates Airlines

Courtesy Emirates Airlines


THE race is on to operate the world’s longest non-stop flight. Ever since Singapore Airlines (SIA) suspended its flight from Singapore to New York in 2013, nine years after it was launched, the honour has fallen to various airlines. Qantas was the last to hold the record for distance flown, operating between Sydney and Dallas Fort Worth, until Mar 2 when Emirates Airlines commenced scheduled flights from Dubai to Auckland.

The inaugural Emirates flight using an Airbus A380 aircraft (subsequent services will use the Boeing B777 aircraft) flew a distance of 14,200 km (8,824 miles), compared to 13,800 km covered by the Qantas flight. The scheduled flight time is 17 hours and 15 minutes, about half an hour longer than the Qantas flight of 16 hours and 55 minutes. However, the inaugural flight landed earlier than scheduled, clocking only 16 hours and 24 minutes.

Some of the other notable ultra long haul flights clocking more 16 hours and more are operated by Delta Air Lines (Atlanta/Johannesburg), Etihad Airways (Abu Dhabi/Los Angeles), Emirates (Dubai/Los Angeles), Saudi Arabian Airways (Jeddah/Los Angeles), Qatar Airways (Doha/Los Angeles), Emirates (Dubai/Houston), Etihad (Abu Dhabi/San Francisco), American Airlines (Dallas Fort Worth/Hong Kong), Emirates (Dubai/San Francisco), and Cathay Pacific (Hong Kong/New York).

While SIA had announced its intention to reintroduce its non-stop flight from Singapore to New York in 2017, Emirates looks determined to maintain the record for now. The Middle East carrier will be launching a non-stop service from Dubai to Panama City by the end of the month. The scheduled flight time is 17 hours and 35 minutes, shorter than the 19 hours of the erstwhile SIA flight.

As the industry heralds a return to the good times with the price of fuel at record low levels, airlines can afford a grab for prestigious attention. But surely, more than the prestige, the decision has to also make commercial sense.

Many of the ultra-long flights are operated by the big three of the Gulf region, namely Emirates, Etihad and Qatar. There is intense competition among these neighbouring carriers targeting the US markets, filling a gap left by the American carriers which are beginning to feel the pinch, leading to allegations by some of them of unfair competition. While the concentration may be a matter of the world geography as it is, it nevertheless shows how the Gulf carriers, taking advantage of improved technology that has continuously made flying a longer distance possible, are intent on driving a trend to reach the far corners of the world in a single hop.

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About Dingzi
Writer by passion, with professional expertise in aviation, customer service and creative writing. Aviation veteran, author, editor and management consultant. Besides commentary on business issues and life-interest topics, travel stories and book reviews, genres include fiction, poetry and plays. Nature lover who abhors cruelty of any form to animals, and a tireless traveler. Above all, a dreamer.

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