Benefits come with a price, so British Airways is boarding cheap fares last

Gate boarding procedures vary across the industry, from an open system of “anyone can board at any time” to specific policies that assign the order of who get on first. This only becomes an issue with economy passengers as premium classes as has been their privilege may board on their own time.

Because of limited overhead bin space, economy passengers may compete to board early. Traditionally most airlines board passengers from the rear so as to avoid bottlenecks in the aisle. The idea is to hasten the process that may cause a delay in take-off if it becomes problematic. From the perspective of efficiency, that seems to make a lot of sense.

Courtesy British Airways

That, until some airlines hit on the opportunity to make boarding a benefit to be purchased in a bucket of ancilliary charges. Now British Airways (BA) has announced that it will board passengers who have paid cheaper economy fares last. BA said the new procedures aim to “speed up the process and make it simpler for customers to understand.” Really? That’s a hard pill to swallow.

BA’s defence is that this is already a procedure practised by some other carriers. Yes, US carriers such as the Big Three of American, United and Delta have introduced basic economy fares – their version of budget fare to counter the no-frills competition – which do just that besides other non-entitlements such as no seat assignment until boarding at the gate.

But there is one difference – passengers are made aware of that sub-class before they amke the choice. However, most airlines sell different fares for the same economy seats, designed to help them sell the seats. One wonders if you purchase a ticket during a promotion period and become committed to flying maybe a year later, will you now be penalised for not paying a higher fare that is usually the case closer to the date of the flight? It is only fair that customers know and understand what they are paying for.

Of course, BA’s new procedures have already raised a lot of ire among its customers. Some of them feel that while they may have purchased cheap fares, they do not deserve to be made to feel cheap or to be treated as such. Oh well, as some people may say, you have the choice. Or, take it with a pinch of salt as Banjobob@scottishcringe says: “Nothing quite like a British class system to let you know your place!” Or, punch back with a new challenge, as Martin Lovatt wrote on Twitter: “I wonder if disembarkation will be in the reverse order then?” Now, that will be quite a task managing the process in economy based on fare.

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What defines a best airline?

What defines a best airline, considering the different surveys that rank them? Conde Nast Travel has just released its readers’ choice of the best in 2017, and it is no surprise the list is made up of Asian, Middle East, European and SW Pacific carriers.

Courtesy Air New Zealand

Of course, it depends on the readership, but recognizing that, it also points to what really makes these airlines stand out. It is clear that the premium class service weighs heavily – the seat comfort and the fine food.

Etihad Airways (ranked #16) offers “the future of first-class comfort: a three-room “residence” with a bedroom, private bath with shower, and lounge.” Emirates (#4) offers “posh perks for premium fliers – cocktail lounges, in-flight showers… part of the reason it scores so high among travellers.” And the suites on Singapore Airlines (#3) offer “a pair of fully flat recliners that can be combined into a double bed.”

Mention is made of the premium economy class in almost all the ranked airlines” KLM (#20), Lufthansa (#19), Japan Airlines (#17), All Nippon Airways (#13), Qantas (#12), Cathay Pacific (#10), Virgin Atlantic (#7), Virgin Australia (#6), Singapore Airlines (#3) and Air New Zealand (#1).

So it may appear to be the voice of the premium travellers that is being heard. Maybe coach travellers aren’t too concerned about the ranking, more driven by price and less frilly factors, although to be fair, the Conde Nast report did mention of at least one airline, i.e. Etihad Airways (#16), not ignoring “those sitting in the back.” While many travellers may resign to the belief that the economy class is about the same across the industry, it is reasonable to assume that an airline that strives to please its customers in the front cabins will most probably carry that culture or at least part of it to the rear.

Although you may draw consensus across many of the surveys, it is best best to treat each one of them in isolation. It is more meaningful to try and draw intra conclusions within the findings of the particular survey.

You will note in the Conde Nast findings, there is an absence of American (including Canadian) carriers, never mind that of African and South American carriers.

Asiana Airlines (#8) is ranked ahead of Korean Air (#11).

All Nippon Airways (#13) is ranked ahead of Japan Airlines (#17). V

Virgin Australia (#6) is ranked ahead of Qantas (#12).

The order of the “Big 3” Gulf carriers is as follows: Qatar Airways (#2), Emirates (#4) and Etihad Airways (#16).

Of European carriers, there is the conspicuous absence of the big names of British Airways (compare Virgin Atlantic #7) and Air France, and the pleasant surprise of Aegean Airlines (#9) while SWISS seems to be regaining its erstwhile status years ago as being the industry standard.

The best belongs to Air New Zealand as the quiet achiever.

Ultimately, the results also depend on the group of respondents whose experiences may be limited to certain airlines.

Other airlines ranked in the top 20 of the Conde Nast survey: Finnair (#14), Turkish Airlines (#15), EVA Air (#18).

Star power in British Airways’ new safety video

Ever since Air New Zealand (Air NZ) made the bold move to ditch the traditional safety video format for something more entertaining, some airlines have followed suit to be different. It started with the objective to arrest the attention of passengers who would otherwise be disinterested. It has certainly become a talking point that raises the profile of the airline – for as long as the script remains topical and appealing.

The pertinent question is at what point the new video ceases to be a safety demo and becomes pure entertainment with a life of its own. That depends on how well the safety message still comes through taken out of the normal environment of the aircraft. And when the production tries to do more than just educate and entertain but advertise or sell a third product, things can get pretty muddled up as in the case of a joint promotion by Qantas and Australian Tourism.

Courtesy British Airways

What appeals to the passengers? A good story or a favorite movie recall such as Air NZ’s adoption of the Lord of the Rings’ Middle Earth. Or, popular personalities, particularly movie idols, as British Airways (BA) has done with a new star-powered video to be launched in September. It features Chiwetel Ejiofor, Gordon Ramsay, Thandie Newton, Ian McKellen, Jim Broadbent and Gillian Anderson among others, not forgetting, of course, Rowan Atkinson aka Mr Bean! It is clearly British humor, and to the production’s credit, executed without shadowing the safety message.

BA chairman and CEO Alex Cruz said: “It’s extremely important to us that customers engage with our safety video, and involving some of the nation’s most well-know personalities has given us the chance to create something fun that we hope people will watch from start to finish – and remember.”

However, the old format, dull as it is, never gets out of date whereas the new format needs to keep up with the times to sustain the excitement. While many would just do something else instead of watching the old video, equally many others may sigh “not again” if the newly formatted version becomes an over-shown re-run. Passengers will therefore expect seasonal changes. Well, at least that’s something to look forward to.

Air France to “boost” performance with new low-cost carrier

Legacy airlines in Europe have long been feeling the pinch from low-cost carriers such as Ryanair and Easyjet. Now it looks like Norwegian Air Shuttle and WOW Air are pushing them to look farther before they lose more ground.
Lufthansa already offers a low-cost trans-Atlantic option from Europe to Las Vegas, Orlando, Miami and Seattle in the United States.

The International Airlines Group which owns British Airways, Iberia, Aer Lingusm and Vueling has just added another low-cost carrier – Level – to its stable. Level, based in Barcelona, will fly to Los Angeles and Oakland in California USA, Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic, and Buenos Aires in Argentina. Fares start at the familiar €99 reminiscent of the Norwegian and WOW Air’s promotions.

Courtesy Air France

Following in their footsteps is Air France, which announces the formation of a new subsidiary low-cost airline – Boost as its working name – planned to commence operations in winter. The airline will fly from the main hubs of the Air France/KLM group to destinations in Italy, Spain and Turkey initially, and then farther to destinations in Asia. Norwegian is already flying to Bangkok and will in October connect London with Singapore.

But Boost will be taking on full-service airlines as well, such as the Middle East carriers of Emirates Airlines, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways which are already ruffling the feathers of the regional big birds of Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific.

The developments point to a gradual convergence of the low-cost and full-service product perceived value wise. It’s the antithetical success of low-cost carriers pushing to bridge the gulf and the failure of legacy airlines not being able to maintain if not increase the differentiation. It looks like the European tug-of-war is pulling the legacy airlines towards the centre line.

Rising budget tide: Alitalia unbundles, IAG launches budget long-haul

Courtesy Getty Images

YET another legacy airline is going budget. Italian flag carrier Alitalia will adopt the unbundling model of budget carriers by charging for what will now be considered perks – seat selection, luggage and in-flight meals and drinks. This will be implemented for flights of four hours or less.

Alitalia CEO Cramer Ball said the airline had “absolutely no alternative” but to follow suit, coming soon after British Airways started charging for meals. He said: “If we can’t compete throughout Italy and Europe against low-cost carriers, then we lose air travellers that connect into intercontinental flights.”

Ryanair, EasyJet, Norwegian Air Shuttle, WOW Air, Eurowings (owned by Lufthansa) and Vueling (owned by International Airlines Group – IAG – which also owns British Airways, Iberia and Aer Lingus) are among the budget carriers viewed as close competitors.

Unbundling is not new even among legacy airlines. US carriers such as Delta Air Lines and United Airlines are already offering “basic economy” whose low fare does not come with cabin baggage allowance and seat selection, and holders of such tickets will be boarded last.

Courtesy IAG

In the wake of the rising budget tide, IAG announces its decision to launch a long-haul budget carrier – Level – to complement Veuling’s short-haul. Level, which becomes the fifth brand within the group, will be based in Barcelona with flights to the Americas that include destinations such as Los Angeles, Oakland, Buenos Aires and Punta Cana.

IAG chief executive Willie Walsh said: “Barcelona is Vueling’s home base and this will allow customers to connect from Vueling’s extensive European network onto Level’s long-haul flights.”

Clearly, legacy airlines can no longer hide behind their pride of providing a service that is safe from the aggression of budget carriers. It is up to the consumers to decide, whether the extra dollars charged justify the perceived better standards. In today’s price-sensitive market, the bottom-line counts, and legacy airlines unbunding the fare package will make an easier comparison.

They will be faced with the challenge to convince the travellers of that something extra over and above price that they will continue to provide but which budget carriers may not have the capability or capacity to offer, such as mileage perks, compensation for flight delays and product shortcomings, ease of booking, schedule flexibility, and after-sale customer attention.

Many budget carriers, for example, do not have adequate Plan B when a flight is cancelled or delayed, and your chances of getting out of that situation soonest is better with legacy airlines in light of their frequency, connections and codeshare arrangements.

Things are getting better for Economy travel

Courtesy Getty Images

American Airlines is not going to let rival Delta Air Lines go it alone in bringing back free meals for their flights. (See Delta Air Lines ups the ante, reintroducing free meals in Economy, 19 Feb 2017) However, American will for a start reinstate the freebie only two domestic routes – New York to Los Angeles and New York to San Francisco. Nevertheless it is an indication of how the competition is heating up, and how the game has come a full circle. It is only to be expected that United Airlines (and others) will follow suit.

In the end, it is not a matter of the meals but one of being ahead in the game, doing something different. Interestingly, across the pond in Europe, British Airways (BA) is doing away with free meals and has announced plans to add more seats in Economy, thus reducing the pitch. (See British Airways is becoming more “budget” than Ryanair, 7 Mar 2017) Here the critical question is whether BA is a leader or a follower in the European context, although it appears it is somewhat of a Johnny-Come-Lately and what Delta and American are doing may force it to re-think its strategy.

At no time than now is coach travel getting more attention from the airlines, which understandably have been paying lots more attention to the premium product because of the higher yield. (See Cathay’s loss is a sign of the times, 16 Mar 2017) And that’s good news for the majority of travellers.

British Airways is becoming more “budget” than Ryanair

Courtesy Getty Images

NOT too long ago, British Airways (BA) did away with complimentary meals on short flights. (See No more free meals for BA short haul, Jan 16, 2017) Now, in yet another move to operate like a budget carrier, it is squeezing in more seats in its planes and that means less legroom.

According to some media reports, BA seat space will be the same as budget carrier Easyjet, even less than Ryanair.

A BA spokesman said the initiative would keep the fare low. But, of course, that’s to be expected. Air travellers will do better to recognise the new BA as belonging to the same category of low end operators when they are booking flights. And, sadly for BA, it can only mean it is facing tough competition.

BA’s partner airlines – Iberia, Vueling and Aer Lingus – under the International Airlines Group (IAG) are also offering the same seat space.

And, if you’re thinking of complaining about any aspect of BA’s service, think again. There is a £25 fee. If it makes you feel any better, that applies to Easyjet as well. Just don’t make the mistake of expecting more from a legacy-but-no-longer-full-service airline!