Airbus A380: Big is not necessarily beautiful

Courtesy Airbus

BIG is not necessarily beautiful. Now that Qantas has cancelled its order for eight Airbus A380 superjumbo jets while Emirates, the largest operator of the double-decker jet, is also considering switching some orders to the smaller A350, the future of the world’s biggest aircraft hangs in the balance.

A Qantas spokesman said: “These aircraft have not been part of the airline’s fleet and network plans for some time.”

Clearly things are changing and the preference is trending towards a smaller but more fuel efficient aircraft.

The A380, which can carry as many 850 passengers, is supposed to cater to the rising demand for seats and at the same time relieve airport congestion. However, ten years after its inauguration, the industry is yet again shifting. It may seem the ideal solution moving more people at the same time. But as more airlines compete with non-stop flights, filling to capacity becomes increasingly challenging.

Qatar Airways Group CEO Akbar Al Baker said: “As an aircraft, it is very well suited for routes that require high capacity. We have successfully deployed it in markets where we see this large volume of passengers and operate to slot-restricted airports.” However, he was of the opinion that “this aircraft is very heavy (and) has very high fuel consumption.”

Besides, its size does not allow the flexibility to use it on other less populated routes which are dependent on seasonal demands.

Qatar has 10 A380s in its fleet. Other major operators include Singapore Airlines (24), Lufthansa (14), Qantas (12) and British Airways (12). But none comes near Emirates’ fleet of 109 with more than 50 on order.

Qantas considers “crazy” ideas for ultra-long flight

Courtesy Reuters

Qantas is taking the lead in raising the bar for the ultra-long flight. And it is understandable why. The Australian flag carrier will be launching the world’s longest flight from Sydney to London in 2022 – a journey of 20 hours and 20 minutes.

Qantas is already flying non-stop from Perth to London, but the flight (17 hours and 20 minutes) is shorter than Qatar Airways’ 18-hour flight from Doha to Auckland and Singapore Airlines (SIA)’s flight from Singapore to New York (closer to 19 hours).

However, not many people may think staying up in the air for that long a time is the best way to travel. So the task for Qantas is to shift that mindset. According to the airline, their Perth-London experience has shown that health and wellness are the main concerns of passengers, and these may be translated into “comfort, sleep, dining, entertainment, and state of mind”.

The package goes beyond providing more comfortable seating, noise-reduced headsets and food specially designed to help the body adjust to the journey.

The limited space of the aircraft’s pressurized cabins and its complete lack of view pose a big challenge. So pre-flight programs become an option.

Qantas has introduced a lounge at Perth International with ‘light therapy’ showers, hydration menus and yoga classes to reduce the effects of jetlag. But this facility is only open to customers travelling in business, gold, platinum and platinum one Frequent Flyers, Oneworld emerald and sapphire customers, and Qantas Club members and their guests.

What about the rest of the travelers who are travelling in economy? These are the passengers who probably need more convincing than premium passengers. Unless, as in the case of SIA’s Singapore to Newark flight which offers only business and premium class seats (there again, certain privileges may not apply to the lower class).

That said, what really matters is what happens on the flight. According to a Qantas study, suggestions include common spaces for stretching (now there’s the rule about not conglomerating), a cafe and stand-bar (which is not new even for the long-haul), exercise bikes and guided meditations.

Think cruise, as it were, although that’s not quite a fair comparison. But they all seem to be saying: If you can’t sleep through the flight or enjoy the view outside, and when you are tired after watching several movies or getbleary-eyed reading, you want to be doing something else or simply to get out of your seat.

Qantas said it is thinking outside the box and considering some “crazy” ideas. That will certainly change the flying experience, cost aside. It may mean the return of luxury air travel at least for the ultra-long haul.

But it is a strategic investment for the flying kangaroo “because of where Australia is situated on the globe,” said Phil Capps, head of customer experience. He added, “we’ve always had to push the boundaries of long-haul flying to ensure our passengers arrive at their destination ready for the next stage of their journey.”

While more airlines are battling it out in the long and ultra-long haul arena, the real competitor for Qantas may be SIA since there may still be many travelers who prefer to break their journey and because Singapore Changi Airport is the indisputable airport for transiting. The corollary is that SIA will be equally challenged to keep them coming through Changi.

Qantas is changing the game

Courtesy Getty Images

After the successful launch of the non-stop Perth-to-London flight in March, Qantas is now working on plans to introduce a non-stop Sydney-to-London flight, which is expected to take a little more than 20 hours. Boeing and Airbus have been invited to retrofit an aircraft that will fly the distance, and Qantas CEO Alan Joyce expected a launch by 2020.

This is set to be a game changer, continuing the momentum set by the Perth non-stop which, according to the Australian flag carrier, is performing well, and in fact, exceeding expectations. Mr Joyce himself said early signs were positive, and that the new route “is the highest rating service on our network.”

The task now is how to make the ultra-long haul comfortable enough to influence the pattern of travel and get non-believers on board. According to the Independent, a Twitter poll with over 1,200 responses showed that 40 per cent would prefer a non-stop flight, 30 per cent would want a break in the journey, and the remaining 30 per cent said it would depend on the fare.

“We’re challenging ourselves to think outside the box,” said Mr Joyce. “Would you have the space used for other activities – exercise, bar, creche, sleeping areas and berths?”

Maybe think, along the line of a cruise?

One suggestion put forth was converting the plane’s cargo hold into sleeping pods.

With more non-stop ultra-long haul flights from Australia – Perth now, Sydney next and most likely Melbourne to follow suit – to London and possibly other European destinations such as Paris and Athens (and further down the road to key destinations in Africa and the Americas as well), how will this affect the competition?

The Kangaroo Route has been a lucrative route for Qantas and rivals that include Singapore Airlines (SIA) and Middle East carriers, notably Emirates Airlines (despite its alliance with Qantas), Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways, flying via their home airports. Even Cathay Pacific may be counted as a veritable competitor.

However, these airlines are themselves also operating the ultra-long haul, so they are not unaware of how the game may be changing. Take, for example, the Middle East: Emirates, Etihad and Qatar are all operating non-stop to Los Angeles, albeit from their different home airports of Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Doha respectively, in close proximity, and this is besides Saudi Arabian Airlines (Saudia) flying from Jeddah. Both Emirates and Qatar are also flying non-stop to Auckland.

Asian rivals Cathay Pacific and Philippines airlines both fly non-stop from New York to Hong Kong and Manila respectively, and will soon be joined by SIA connecting the Big Apple with Singapore. Cathay and Philippines are also competing on the non-stop option from Toronto, while SIA and United Airlines are taking on each other flying non-stop between San Francisco and Singapore.

Perhaps to the relief of Qantas, British Airways (BA) has expressed no interest in mounting non-stop flights between Australia and the UK. In fact, over the years, BA has reduced its interest in Australia, currently operating only one service from London to Sydney via Singapore.

It seems that the ultra-long haul aims at narrowing the rivalry on key routes where point-to-point traffic is the target, and is perhaps also an attempt to claim native rights, cutting out third parties jumping on the bandwagon. The question is whether there is adequate traffic to justify the operations.

The fortunes of some airlines may shift, so too those of some airports which rely on transit traffic with no real attraction other than being a convenient stop en route. One only needs to look back at how Bahrain Airport quickly lost its status when new technologically advanced aircraft able to fly a longer distance without refuelling emerged on the horizon.

Dubai International and Singapore Changi are two popular hubs on the Kangaroo Route. How will their fortunes change?

Yes, they may lose some traffic with Qantas flying direct from Perth, Sydney and Melbourne, but all is not lost so long as there continues to be up to 70 per cent of travellers who are yet convinced the ultra-long haul is the way to fly. The airlines themselves understand the dynamics, hence the dual strategy, offering the options. Qantas may reduce some flights, but it is unlikely to completely stop flying via Dubai or Singapore. Similarly, SUA will not cease making a stop at an Asian port just because it has introduced non-stop flights to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Again, if one sees how Dubai International does what Bahrain could not do, reviving the importance of a Middle East hub with convenient connections to Europe and Africa, no less owing to the vast network of Emirates, and how Changi has enticed transit and transfer passengers with being more than just another airport, one can be hopeful of their future. They may even flourish as important regional hubs, feeding traffic from and into the ultra-long haul flights.

And don’t forget, non-stop flights cost more. People spend their dollar in different ways.

Qantas continues to fly high, confident about the future

Courtesy Getty Images

Qantas continues to fly high with new confidence while most other airlines cringe at the prospect of reduced profitability or even losses in the wake of rising fuel prices.

The Australian national carrier posted a record profit of A$1.6 billion (US$1.2 billion) for the year up to June 30, 2018 – 14 per cent higher than last year and 5 per cent higher than the last record profit in 2016. All that despite incurring a fuel bill that increased by almost A$200 million, and which is expected to go up another A$690 million the current year.

Qantas chief Alan Joyce said: “We’re facing another increase to our fuel bill for FY19 and we’re confident that we will substantially recover this through a range of capacity, revenue and cost efficiency measures, in addition to our hedging program.”

The confidence is something of a rarity these days as the fortune of the industry becomes increasingly volatile these days, and most airline leaders choose to be conservative in their forecast moving forward, often citing the uncertainty of the fuel price and, of course, competition.

Qantas has risen to become Asia-Pacific’s – if not the world’s – star performer.

The airline’s performance was boosted by a record profit of A$1.1 billion, up 25 per cent, in the domestic market, achieved through the combination of Qantas and Jetstar’s network, schedule and product strengths in key markets.

Internationally, the airline’s earnings rose7 per cent on the back of a 4-per cent increase in capacity, achieving a load factor of 84 per cent. The new Perth-London route is said to be the highest rating service in its network, and this should cause some concern to its rivals plying the kangaroo route, Singapore Airlines being one of them.

Mr Joyce emphasized that “capacity discipline” was key to Qantas’ success. With strong forward bookings, the airline can certainly afford to be optimistic.

2018 Skytrax airline awards: Largely the same winners

Top airlines remain largely the same ones as last year’s.

Yet again we note how the top ten airlines remained largely the same ones as last year’s. If you’re good, you’re good, so it seems, and consistency won the day.

Singapore Airlines (SIA) which was second last year switched places with last year’s winner Qatar Airways. All Nippon Airways (ANA) and Emirates Airlines held steady in 3rd and 4th position. Cathay Pacific moved down one rung to 6th,, exchanging places with EVA Air. Lufthansa held its 7th position. Garuda Indonesian followed Hainan Airlines up one notch to 8th and 9th position respectively. The only new entrant to the list was Thai Airways International, which actually only moved up one rung from 11th last year, edging out Etihad Airways as it fell from 8th to 15th position.

So much for the excitement as the winning airlines, going by the result of the survey, continued to please their customers who found no reason to think otherwise of them.

Unlike some high-brow surveys whose results lean heavily on the premium class, Skytrax does readings across all classes.

Best for First Class was SIA followed by Etihad and Air France. This used to be the realm of Asian and Middle-East carriers, and let it not be a surprise to see two European carriers in the ranking. Lufthansa took 4th place.

Best for Business Class was Qatar followed by SIA and ANA. You would imagine that if an airline is good in First, it should not be too far off in Business. However, Air France was not placed in the top ten list and Lufthansa ranked 8th.

Best for Premium Economy was Air New Zealand followed by Qantas and SIA. It looks like the Pacific airlines are pretty good with this product. Lufthansa and Air France ranked 4th and 5th.. There was an absence of Middle-east carriers because they didn’t believe in such a class. Qatar chief CEO Akbar Al Baker had said: “We won’t roll out premium economy… I don’t think there is room for premium economy in our region, and of course in Qatar Airways. We give you a premium economy seat with an economy class price.” Sounds familiar if you recall the early days when SIA too expressed the same skepticism. However, Emirates has said its new Airbus A380 expected to be delivered in 2020 will feature premium economy.

Courtesy Star Alliance

Best for Economy Class was Thai Airways followed by SIA and Qatar. This category was dominated by Asian carriers with the exception of Lufthansa in 9th position.

Only these six airlines were placed in all three categories of First, Business and Economy (excluding premium Economy since not all airlines offer this sub-class): ANA, Cathay, Emirates, Lufthansa, Qatar and SIA. You can then rest comforted that whatever class you travel with these airlines, you will be treated without discrimination.

But is the Skytrax survey a good guide in choosing which carrier to fly with? Generally people can agree on makes a good airline. What matters when you travel with an airline? For the long haul, seat comfort is an important feature. Inflight entertainment, if you look for some distraction and are not otherwise doing something else or trying to catch up on shuteye. A good meal, if you are not one who will not eat airline food no matter what (unfortunately this is not featured in the Skytrax survey). Cabin cleanliness, of course, and that includes the condition of the washrooms. How often do you see the crew give it a clean-up and spraying some kind of deodorant to try and make it as pleasant as it possibly can be? Above all, the service provided by the cabin crew, to be treated in a friendly manner and with respect. Not forgetting service on the ground in the event that you may need assistance, as when your bag is damaged or has not arrived with you.

Perhaps the ranking for some of these more specific services may be of some help:

Best Economy seat (First and Business should be way better anyway): 1st Japan Airlines, 2nd SIA and 3rd Thai Airways.

Best cabin crew: 1st Garuda, 2nd SIA and 3rd ANA.

Best inflight entertainment: 1st Emirates, 2nd SIA and 3rd Qatar.

Cleanest cabin: 1st ANA, 2nd EVA and 3rd Asiana Airlines.

Best airport service: 1st EVA, 2nd ANA and 3rd Cathay.

But, of course, you can’t expect a single airline to be best in all categories, but you get a pretty good idea of where they all stand, perhaps with exceptions.

Much Ado About China’s Geography

Since the United States (USA) have recognized the one-China policy (following a resolution of the United Nations in the early 1970s that legitimized the sole representation of the People’s Republic of China), it would appear groundless, even against logic, that it should protest the Chinese demand for US carriers to reflect Taiwan as a Chinese territory (this applies also to the autonomous regions of Hong Kong and Macau) on their websites.

While many airlines including British Airways, Air France, Lufthansa and Singapore Airlines have reflected the change in their booking itnerfaces to comply with the ruling, US carriers – United Airlines, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines – have yet to agree, apparently at the urging of the Trump administration. But China is not budging while extending the deadline from May 25 to July 25, at the same time rejecting the US request to discuss the issue.

It may be said that there’s a fine line between politics and business, that it is difficult to separate the two. Yet it seems only expected that any company that wishes to engage in business with a country should respect its sovereignty. A way out – even if it means turning a blind eye – is to recognize the independence of business operations, that the decision of the airlines concerned is purely commercial.

So it is with Qantas, which has decided to comply with Beijing’s request after the initial resistance. As with the USA, the Australian government, while embracing the one-China policy, was critical of the Chinese ruling, but conceded that how Qantas structured its website was a matter for the company. Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said: “Private companies should be free to conduct their usual business operations free from political pressure of governments.”

So, will US carriers comply or be prepared to stop flying to China?

Qantas marks new milestone with Perth-London nonstop flight

Courtesy EPA

At last, Qantas is able to shift the kangaroo route to flying nonstop from Perth to London Heathrow, marking a new historical milestone. The inaugural flight on March 25 managed the journey in just over 17 hours, flying more than 9,000 miles, making it as of now the world’s second longest after Qatar Airways’ Doha-to-Auckland flight.

The lucrative so-called kangaroo route used to be operated via other airports, from as many as six in the old days to only one recently via either Dubai or Singapore. While Qantas is not giving up its operations through these other ports, the Perth-Heathrow non-stop service now offers a viable alternative that may well reduce the traffic through them and enhance the chances of Perth becoming a hub airport.

The growing popularity of the non-stop ultra long-haul as more airlines begin mounting such services is helping to shift the demographics, noting however there may still be travellers who may prefer to break their journey to stretch their legs, and airports like Singapore Changi are not pulling the stops to continue to entice transit travellers with facilities and amenities that promise to pamper and spoil them.

Qantas is said to have done much homework to help passengers overcome possible jetlag issues and minimise the discomfort of such a long flight, working with university researchers on the response of the human body to such conditions and equipping the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner jet with features that improve air quality and lower cabin noise.

It is understood that the inaugural flight carried more than 200 passengers for a capacity of 236 seats configured for 42 Business, 28 Premium Economy and 166 Economy. Now the challenge for Qantas to fill up the aircraft is marketing Perth as the hub for the kangaroo route, channeling traffic from other parts of Australia – until the dream of a similar non-stop from Sydney and Melbourne to London becomes a reality, then when one might ask, how long is it too long to be sitting in an aircraft?