Benefits come with a price, so British Airways is boarding cheap fares last

Gate boarding procedures vary across the industry, from an open system of “anyone can board at any time” to specific policies that assign the order of who get on first. This only becomes an issue with economy passengers as premium classes as has been their privilege may board on their own time.

Because of limited overhead bin space, economy passengers may compete to board early. Traditionally most airlines board passengers from the rear so as to avoid bottlenecks in the aisle. The idea is to hasten the process that may cause a delay in take-off if it becomes problematic. From the perspective of efficiency, that seems to make a lot of sense.

Courtesy British Airways

That, until some airlines hit on the opportunity to make boarding a benefit to be purchased in a bucket of ancilliary charges. Now British Airways (BA) has announced that it will board passengers who have paid cheaper economy fares last. BA said the new procedures aim to “speed up the process and make it simpler for customers to understand.” Really? That’s a hard pill to swallow.

BA’s defence is that this is already a procedure practised by some other carriers. Yes, US carriers such as the Big Three of American, United and Delta have introduced basic economy fares – their version of budget fare to counter the no-frills competition – which do just that besides other non-entitlements such as no seat assignment until boarding at the gate.

But there is one difference – passengers are made aware of that sub-class before they amke the choice. However, most airlines sell different fares for the same economy seats, designed to help them sell the seats. One wonders if you purchase a ticket during a promotion period and become committed to flying maybe a year later, will you now be penalised for not paying a higher fare that is usually the case closer to the date of the flight? It is only fair that customers know and understand what they are paying for.

Of course, BA’s new procedures have already raised a lot of ire among its customers. Some of them feel that while they may have purchased cheap fares, they do not deserve to be made to feel cheap or to be treated as such. Oh well, as some people may say, you have the choice. Or, take it with a pinch of salt as Banjobob@scottishcringe says: “Nothing quite like a British class system to let you know your place!” Or, punch back with a new challenge, as Martin Lovatt wrote on Twitter: “I wonder if disembarkation will be in the reverse order then?” Now, that will be quite a task managing the process in economy based on fare.

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What do Conde Nast best airports have in common?

Yet again – and again – no surprise who tops Conde Nast’s pick of the best airport, or even the top five which are located either in Asia or the Middle East What do these airports have in common?

According to Conde Nast, they stand out “with enough amenities and time-wasters that you might be a little late boarding that flight.” Such frills include indoor waterfalls and great restaurants. In other words, they have to be more than just a fucntional facility for air transportation – however efficient although one must assume efficiency is a key consideration.

Courtesy Changi Airport Group

Top in the ranks is Singapore Changi, followed by Seoul’s Incheon, Dubai International, Hong Kong International and Doha’s Hamad International.

Size matters. They are all huge airports. Changi has a handling capacity of 82 million passengers a year. Incheon is adding a second terminal which will double capacity to 100 million passengers annually, and Dubai Intl is aiming for 200 million passengers yearly. Hong Kong Intl handled more than 70 million passengers last year. Opened only in 2014, Hamad Intl is fast growing, recording a throughput of 37 million passengers last year, an increase of 20%.

They are hub airports. Dubai is now the world’s largest airport for international passenger throughput, edging out London Heathrow. Hong Kong Intl is positioning itself as a gateway to Asia in competition with Changi, with connections to some 50 destinations in China.

They are supported by strong home airlines with extensive connections: Qatar Airways (Hamad Intl), Cathay Pacific (Hong Kong Intl), Emirates Airlines (Dubai Intl), Korean Air and Asiana Airlines (Incheon) and Singapore Airlines (Changi).

They are modern with state-of-the-art infrastructure, and are constantly upgrading. Changi has recently added a fourth terminal where passengers can expect hassle-free processes from check-in to boarding without the need of any human contact.

The Asian airports offer fast rail connections to the city.

And, they are all competing to provide the most alluring “time-wasters”. Changi made news when it offered a swimming pool where passengers with time on their hand could relax and soak int he tropical sun. Now that’s also available at Hamad Intl, where you may even play a game of squash too. While Dubai is known to be one of the world’s biggest duty-free shopping centres, Hong Kong Intl is reputed for its great restaurants. Incheon is uniquely Korean with its “Cultural Street” that showcases local cuisine, dance performances, and arts and craft workshops. It also boasts an indoor skating rink and a spa. Hamad Intl too has an exhibit hall for that cultural touch.

Changi comes closest to being a destination in itself where it is said a passenger wouldn’t mind a flight delay. Besides the swimming pool, there are: an indoor waterfall, a butterfly garden, a swimming pool, vast play areas for families with children, and an array of restaurants and shops. And for passengers with at least a transit of six hours, you can hope on a free city tour.

But, of course, all these would not mean much if they are not supported by efficiency and friendly service.

Qatar Airways acquires stake in Cathay Pacific: Is there a strategy in place?

IT is not surprising to see cash-rich Qatar Airways buying stakes in other carriers. It already has stakes in International Airlines Group (20%) which owns British Airways, Iberia, Vueling and Aer Lingus; South America’s LATAM Airlines Group (10%) and Italian airline Meridiana (49%). It was however rebuffed by American Airlines.

Courtesy Qatar Airways

The Middle East airline’s latest buy is a 9.6% stake in one Asia’s leading airlines, namely Cathay Pacific, for HK$6.5bn (US$662m). Now that might not have come as expected, although both airlines which are OneWorld partners have publicly acknowledged the outcome as a positive one. Qatar chief executive Akbar Al Baker was pleased with “massive potential for the future” and Cathay chief executive Rupert Hogg looked forward to “a continued constructive relationship.”

Unlike Gulf rival Emirates Airlines, Qatar has seen acquisitions in key partners as a way to access the wider market. Tying up with Cathay would open up opportunities to tap into the wide and growing China market. That depends on how much influence Qatar can assert on Cathay’s China channels, quite unlike the Qantas-Emirates’ relationship although the latter was merely a commercial arrangement. Yet too the way that the aviation business is shaped by the somewhat promiscuous relationships across the industry, it may well be a sitting investment for profit, albeit Cathay’s recent poorer performance.

Perhaps Qatar’s move may be telling more of Cathay, which in fact is a rival airline. Things may not be looking as good at the Hong Kong-based carrier as it embarked on stringent cost-cutting measures to turn its fortune around. Interestingly, news of Qatar’s interest was met with a 5% dip in the price of Cathay’s stock.

United Airlines moves ahead of Singapore Airlines

Courtesy Getty Images

United Airlines does it again, stealing march on rival Singapore Airlines launching its nonstop flight from Los Angeles to Singapore – now the world’s longest nonstop flight – on Oct 28. The flight covers a distance of 8,700 miles and may take as long as 18 hours.

SIA plans to introduce a similar service next year.

Back in February last year, United started a nonstop from San Francisco to Singapore, ahead of SIA’s introduction which came months later in October.

Demand for United’s Los Angeles flight seems healthy, considering the low launch fares for a round trip as low as US$384 which no doubt boosted the sale. No doubt it is good publicity to raise awareness, and it looks like the competition will benefit travellers when SIA joins the race next year. Meantime, United enjoys the run-in to build loyalty.

In Singapore, United’s Vice President of Atlantic and Pacific Sales Marcel Fuchs said: “United is proud to launch the long-awaited Singapore-Los Angeles route for our customers in Singapore.”

In the bigger picture, United must be looking at the initiative as being “the leading US carrier to Asia” as mentioned by its senior vice president of worldwide sales Dave Hilfman, who added that the new route would consolidate the airline’s position in Asia. Conversely, Mr Fuchs said: “The addition of this new exclusive service gives more options for our customers to conveniently connect to our extensive US network.”

Air New Zealand tops again

Courtesy Air New Zealand

AirlineRatings.com has named Air New Zealand as the world’s best airline for 2018. Other airlines that make the top ten in descending order are Qantas, Singapore Airlines (SIA), Virgin Australia, Virgin Atlantic, Etihad Airways, All Nippon Airways (ANA), Korean Air, Cathay Pacific and Japan Airlines.

According to the editorial team, airlines must achieve a seven-star safety rating (developed in consultation with the International Civil Aviation Organization) and demonstrate leadership in innovation for passenger comfort to be named in the top ten.

The evaluation team also looks at customer feedback on sites that include CN Traveller.com which perhaps explain little surprise in both AirlineRatings and Conde Nast Travel naming Air New Zealand as their favourite. (See What defines a best airline? Oct 19, 2017) Four airlines, namely SIA, Virgin Australia, Virgin Atlantic and Cathay Pacific are ranked in the top ten of both lists. These look like consistently global favourites.

Notable absences from the AirlineRatings list are Middle east carriers Qatar Airways and Emirates Airlines. While these airlines scored for service in other surveys, they may have lost the lead in product innovation for which most of the airlines ranked by AirlineRatings are commended. Virgin Australia’s new business class is said to be “turning heads” and Etihad is said to provide a “magnificent product throughout the cabins.” Looking ahead, Air New Zealand will feel the pressure from Qantas and SIA for the top spot. (See Singapore Airlines steps up to reclaim past glory, Nov 3, 2017) In the same survey, Qantas is selected for best lounges and best catering services, and SIA for best first class and best cabin crew.

For those who think best airline surveys are often skewed by the halo effect of service provided in the upper classes, AirlineRatings has named Korean Air as best economy airline.

Singapore Airlines steps up to reclaim past glory

Courtesy Singapore Airlines

Since its inception, the name of Singapore Airlines (SIA) has been synonymous with premium service, particularly in First Class. This shine lost its lustre somewhat in times when the world economy took a tumble and product innovation took a backseat while other airlines caught up.

Now SIA is stepping up to reclaim past glory as the world’s leader in premium comfort. AirlineRatings has just named it 2018 “airline with the best first class”.

The airline is spending S$1.1.5 billion (US$850 million) to overhaul its A380 fleet, thanks to increased competition particularly from Middle East carriers. The first retrofitted aircraft will take to the sky on December 18.

The new product will feature fewer suites in First Class, the number reduced from twelve to six to allow more space for adjustable seats as well as a washroom with a sit-down vanity counter. Now you don’t have to make your bed, sort of, converting it from a sitting position. The suite comes equipped with a separate bed alongside the adjustable leather seat.

While the focus is unabashedly the front end product, SIA is quick to add that premium economy and the economy class will also enjoy a boost in comfort. Premium economy will have a wider pitch and seat, and economy seats will have a backrest design which provides more legroom.

Most travellers in economy will find service not much different among the airlines, particularly for the short haul, when cost more than frills matters. However, you do expect an airline’s reputation for service in the front of the aircraft to rub off a little on how the crew handles the rear.

That’s the kind of issue you get when flying an airline like SIA – the customer’s expectations. Can’t blame the customer. So he or she becomes less forgiving of lapses, which can happen even if you’re the best airline. A traveller told me how on a recent non-stop Singapore-San Francisco flight, the crew were clumsy with the carts and kept dropping stuff. You might excuse that as part of a learning curve if the crew were new, and an exception. But then, really, on SIA?

That’s the price of success. And the pressure to live up to your standards.

Keeping the Asean Dream Alive

AT its recent meeting of Transport Ministers, Asean reiterated its intention to work towards more liberal skies, adopting a master plan to facilitate a more integrated approach to aircraft movement across the region.

Certainly the spirit of co-operation is not lacking, but for a bloc of nations that are far from being uniform economics-wise, the road for consensual implementation is not an easy one to manage when it comes down to the details. Open Skies was to have been fully realized two years ago, i.e. 2015. (See The Elusive Asean Open Skies Dream, Dec 10, 2015).

So what’s new in the latest manifesto, besides the renewed commitment to co-operate? Two agreements to liberalise regional services were signed – one to allow domestic code-share rights, and the other to progressively reduce restrictions on related aviation businesses such as airport ground handling services. These are not exactly ground shakers, as there are already cross border joint-ventures in the region. The reality is one of progression, and its recognition that it takes time so as to not having to constantly move back the goal post while keeping the Asean dream alive.

What is new apparently though is the association’s professed agreement to extend co-operation beyond Asean to other partners. There is already a memorabdum of understanding with China to boost co-operation in aircraft accident investigations. However, on open skies issues, it is not quite clear how the co-operation will take shape, bilaterally vis-a-vis en bloc. Nevertheless, while the Asean dream may be slow in crystalling, it may be more exigent to secure the wider markets beyond its borders.