What would make the new Scoot different?

Singapore Airlines (SIA)’s budget subsidiaires Scoot and Tigerair are now fully merged under one name, i.e. Scoot. Tigerair operated its last flight on July 24.

Why Scoot and not Tigerair? Quite obviously, considering the dotted history of the latter’s operations that ran the gamut of bad publicity from complaints about poor service and flight disruptions to safety infringement that resulted in suspension of its Australian services in 2011.

Adopting the Scoot brand could help distance the new identity from a beleaguered past. Tigerair remained a broken dream for its parent who had named it with the nostalgia of an erstwhile era before SIA broke away from Malaysia-Singapore Airlines to come into its own. Then the airlines was flying the Tiger logo.

Courtesy Scoot

The Scoot/Tigerair merger is marked with a new tagline: Escape the Ordinary. Though not one quite stunning or provocative for a tagline, it is perhaps an ambitious but staid attempt to set itself apart from the pack. Scoot’s original tagline was the somewhat outlandish “Get Outta Here!”

Yet what would make the new Scoot different?

Scoot CEO Lee Lik Hsin said of its new tagline: “It is inspirational to our inner wanderlust, and inspires us to travel and explore the world.”

Given that any and all of the airlines, whether full-service or no-frills, are but a means of transportation, how then will Scoot inspire people to travel with them instead of others? That’s the challenge.

Etihad flies into the red

Courtesy Etihad Airways

Are you surprised that one of the big three Gulf carriers has flown into the red? For the first time since 2011, Etihad Airways reported a hefty loss of US$1.87 billion in 2016 compared with a profit of US$103 million a year ago.

Chairman of the Etihad Aviation Group Mohamed Mubarak Fadhel al-Mazrouei said “a culmination of factors contributed tot he disappointing results.”

The United Arab Emirates airline blamed it on “one-off impairment charges and fuel hedging losses”.

It is a wonder how airlines would always blame poor hedging decisions for losses as if they were not responsible for their failure to correctly read the market. Etihad’s woes include billion dollar charges on aircraft and certain assets, as well as financial exposures to beleaguered equity partners including Alitalia and Air Berlin. Etihad owns 49% of Alitalia and 29.21% of Air Berlin. This has called for some reflection on the airline’s acquisition program.

But Etihad said the core airline business remained solid and strong. Although load factor declined slightly from 79.4% to 78.6%, passenger numbers increased from 17.6 million to 18.5 million.

Etihad’s new CEO Peter Baumgartner however was cautious about the future. He said: “We are in an industry characterized by overcapacity, declining market sizes on key routes and changing customer behaviour as a weak global economy affects spending appetite.”

Understandably, this comes at a time when the United States are imposing restrictions on travel from the Middle East and the airline too is caught in the diplomatic Qatar crisis that has affected regional routes.

Star power in British Airways’ new safety video

Ever since Air New Zealand (Air NZ) made the bold move to ditch the traditional safety video format for something more entertaining, some airlines have followed suit to be different. It started with the objective to arrest the attention of passengers who would otherwise be disinterested. It has certainly become a talking point that raises the profile of the airline – for as long as the script remains topical and appealing.

The pertinent question is at what point the new video ceases to be a safety demo and becomes pure entertainment with a life of its own. That depends on how well the safety message still comes through taken out of the normal environment of the aircraft. And when the production tries to do more than just educate and entertain but advertise or sell a third product, things can get pretty muddled up as in the case of a joint promotion by Qantas and Australian Tourism.

Courtesy British Airways

What appeals to the passengers? A good story or a favorite movie recall such as Air NZ’s adoption of the Lord of the Rings’ Middle Earth. Or, popular personalities, particularly movie idols, as British Airways (BA) has done with a new star-powered video to be launched in September. It features Chiwetel Ejiofor, Gordon Ramsay, Thandie Newton, Ian McKellen, Jim Broadbent and Gillian Anderson among others, not forgetting, of course, Rowan Atkinson aka Mr Bean! It is clearly British humor, and to the production’s credit, executed without shadowing the safety message.

BA chairman and CEO Alex Cruz said: “It’s extremely important to us that customers engage with our safety video, and involving some of the nation’s most well-know personalities has given us the chance to create something fun that we hope people will watch from start to finish – and remember.”

However, the old format, dull as it is, never gets out of date whereas the new format needs to keep up with the times to sustain the excitement. While many would just do something else instead of watching the old video, equally many others may sigh “not again” if the newly formatted version becomes an over-shown re-run. Passengers will therefore expect seasonal changes. Well, at least that’s something to look forward to.

Standing room only on this flight

Those of us who go to the theatre often enough will be familair with the term “Standing Room Only” (SRO). But SRO on a flight?

Budget airline Viva Colombia has just that in mind. Its founder and CEO William Shaw told The Miami Herald: “There are people out there right now researching whether you can fly standing up. We’re very interested inanything that makes travel less expensive.” So, wey not? After all, he said, “Who cares if you don;t have an in-flight entertainment system for a one-hour flight? Or that you don;t get peanuts?”

This thought isn’t new. As far back as 2010, Ryanair flaoted the idea. (See Standing room only up in the air, July 23, 2010) Actually, instead of standing upright as in a bus, passengers will have “vertical seats” to leab against, complete with seatbelts and a small cushion to support the lopwer back – which is said to be good for people with back problems.

Ryanair chief Michael O’Leary was of the opinion that people flying very short hauls (say, up to two hours) wouldn’t mind standing all the way if the fare was that dirt cheap. Then he was thinking of fitting only the rear of the aircraft with vertical seats as a choice.

Vertical seats, otherwise known as saddle seats. Courtesy Airbus.

In fact Airbus put forth the concept in 2003 with the hope that it might be implemented by 2010. Now the South American carrier based in Medellin, Colombia, is reviving the idea. Guess what, the low-cost operator is partly owned by the founders of Ryanair.

Still, the question that hangs in the air is when and if it happens the regulators will approve the operations as safe-worthy.

More Middle East airlines allow laptops in cabin

Good news for Middle East carriers as the United States gradually exempts them from the ban imposed on the carriage of laptops and other electronic gadgets in the cabin.

Etihad Airlines was the first to announce the lift of the ban, followed by Emirates Airlines and Turkish Airlines. Now Qatar Airways becomes the fourth airline to join the list this week. Saudia, the flagship carrier for Saudi Arabia, said its passengers would be able to carry the electronics on board US-bound flights from 19 July.

This follows strengthened security to meet US standards, which include measures such as enhanced screening, more thorough vetting of passengers and the wider use of bomb-sniffer dogs.

Morocco, Jordan, Egypt and Kuwait have yet to announce similar exemption. The UK government which followed the US in imposing similar restrictions on flights originating from Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia have not indicated its readiness to also lift the ban.

For all the initial outcry against the ban and questions about its wisdom, one might concede that the good that came out of it was the greater awareness of in-flight security. But for the airlines compliance means holding up the bottom line. Emirates for one had reported a drop in business because of the ban.

Liquids, laptops and now books

Courtesy Getty Images

AS security screening at airports in the United States gets more stringent as part of the enhanced security program, air travellers can expect longer lines as more items become suspect and subject to more thorough checks.

Added to a host of restrictions on items to be carried into the cabin – objects such as liquids and laptops( if you begin your journey at certain airports in Africa and the Middle East) – are, believe it, books. Under new guidelines issued by the Transportation Security Administration, passengers at some airports have been asked to remove books (even magazines) from carry-on luggage to be screened separately.

Well, we’ve heard of false books or read about them in mystery stories, haven’t we?

There was a time before the advent of electronic devices, a book was almost an essential travelling companion. To be clear, the new rule does not forbid the carriage of a book into the cabin but that it should be screened like your laptop or shoes, and truth be stranger than fiction, there is the odd chance for some reason someone may end up not being allowed to take that book on board!

Indeed, as I had mentioned before in an earlier blog, a time may come when all an air traveller needs to bring with him or her on board are his travel documents and what the administration would define as essentials (such as prescribed mediation) – everything else would or could be provided on board, whether free or at a cost.

Airlines such as Qatar Airways affected by the ban on laptops are already providing loans on board. Looks like a good time for an airline to start an in-flight library of popular books (most likely electronic to avoid carrying additional weight and the cumbersome logistics). Maybe as you book a flight, you may request a copy to be made available. Or bookshops inside the sterile zone could arrange pick-ups of a physical book like your bottle of liquour from Duty Free.

However, in today’s context, the laptop and other electronic devices are likely to be missed more than the physical book by many travellers. So there is good news for Etihad Airways customers as it announced that its plan to conduct “enhanced inspections” had convinced the US to grant it an exemption. Etihad passengers travelling out of Abu Dhabi will go through US customs and border screening before boarding rather than after they touch down in the US.

The isolation of Qatar Airways

Courtesy Alamy

AT a time when its neighbours – Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Libya and Yemen – cut diplomatic ties with Qatar, winning the Skytrax world’s best airline award could not have tasted sweeter to the Qatari flag carrier. It displaced last year’s winner, Emirates Airlines, which fell to 4th ranking.(See Consistency defines Skytrax best airlines, Jun 21, 2017)

The Gulf countries are stopping flights between them and Qatar, and closing their airspace to Qatar Airways. According to Qatar’s chief executive Akbar Al Baker, this has resulted in the cancellation of 52 routes and adding flying routes to others. He was quoted as saying at the Paris Air Show where the award was announced: “At these difficult times of illegal bans on flights out of my country by big bullies, this is an award not to me, not to my airline, but to my country.”

Now Qatar Airways is setting eyes on getting a slice of OneWorld partner American Airlines. It is hoping to buy up to 10 per cent of the US carrier. Investing in foreign carriers is not something entirely new to Qatar Airways. In 2015, the Gulf carrier acquired 10 ten per cent of the International Airlines Group (IAG) which owns British Airways, Iberia, Vueling and Aer Lingus. This was subsequently increased to 20 per cent.

Qatar Airways also owns 10 per cent of South American carrier LATAM and is finalizing a deal to acquire 49 per cent stake of Italy’s Meridiana Fly. It has also expressed interest in Royal Air Maroc and setting up a joint venture in India.
Mr Al Baker has hinted at more acquisitions in the pipeline, but said the airline“is not going to collect crap.”

The timing of Qatar Airways’ interest in American Airlines smacks of more than just part of an expanding acquisition program although it is just as obvious being so. While other Gulf carriers may see the Trump’s restrictions on travel from the region and ban on in-flight carriage of electronic gadgets as a setback, Qatar Airways is keen to expand further into the United States. The isolation by the Gulf neighbours has made it all the more imperative for it to seek stronger relations elsewhere across the globe.