Qantas is changing the game

Courtesy Getty Images

After the successful launch of the non-stop Perth-to-London flight in March, Qantas is now working on plans to introduce a non-stop Sydney-to-London flight, which is expected to take a little more than 20 hours. Boeing and Airbus have been invited to retrofit an aircraft that will fly the distance, and Qantas CEO Alan Joyce expected a launch by 2020.

This is set to be a game changer, continuing the momentum set by the Perth non-stop which, according to the Australian flag carrier, is performing well, and in fact, exceeding expectations. Mr Joyce himself said early signs were positive, and that the new route “is the highest rating service on our network.”

The task now is how to make the ultra-long haul comfortable enough to influence the pattern of travel and get non-believers on board. According to the Independent, a Twitter poll with over 1,200 responses showed that 40 per cent would prefer a non-stop flight, 30 per cent would want a break in the journey, and the remaining 30 per cent said it would depend on the fare.

“We’re challenging ourselves to think outside the box,” said Mr Joyce. “Would you have the space used for other activities – exercise, bar, creche, sleeping areas and berths?”

Maybe think, along the line of a cruise?

One suggestion put forth was converting the plane’s cargo hold into sleeping pods.

With more non-stop ultra-long haul flights from Australia – Perth now, Sydney next and most likely Melbourne to follow suit – to London and possibly other European destinations such as Paris and Athens (and further down the road to key destinations in Africa and the Americas as well), how will this affect the competition?

The Kangaroo Route has been a lucrative route for Qantas and rivals that include Singapore Airlines (SIA) and Middle East carriers, notably Emirates Airlines (despite its alliance with Qantas), Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways, flying via their home airports. Even Cathay Pacific may be counted as a veritable competitor.

However, these airlines are themselves also operating the ultra-long haul, so they are not unaware of how the game may be changing. Take, for example, the Middle East: Emirates, Etihad and Qatar are all operating non-stop to Los Angeles, albeit from their different home airports of Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Doha respectively, in close proximity, and this is besides Saudi Arabian Airlines (Saudia) flying from Jeddah. Both Emirates and Qatar are also flying non-stop to Auckland.

Asian rivals Cathay Pacific and Philippines airlines both fly non-stop from New York to Hong Kong and Manila respectively, and will soon be joined by SIA connecting the Big Apple with Singapore. Cathay and Philippines are also competing on the non-stop option from Toronto, while SIA and United Airlines are taking on each other flying non-stop between San Francisco and Singapore.

Perhaps to the relief of Qantas, British Airways (BA) has expressed no interest in mounting non-stop flights between Australia and the UK. In fact, over the years, BA has reduced its interest in Australia, currently operating only one service from London to Sydney via Singapore.

It seems that the ultra-long haul aims at narrowing the rivalry on key routes where point-to-point traffic is the target, and is perhaps also an attempt to claim native rights, cutting out third parties jumping on the bandwagon. The question is whether there is adequate traffic to justify the operations.

The fortunes of some airlines may shift, so too those of some airports which rely on transit traffic with no real attraction other than being a convenient stop en route. One only needs to look back at how Bahrain Airport quickly lost its status when new technologically advanced aircraft able to fly a longer distance without refuelling emerged on the horizon.

Dubai International and Singapore Changi are two popular hubs on the Kangaroo Route. How will their fortunes change?

Yes, they may lose some traffic with Qantas flying direct from Perth, Sydney and Melbourne, but all is not lost so long as there continues to be up to 70 per cent of travellers who are yet convinced the ultra-long haul is the way to fly. The airlines themselves understand the dynamics, hence the dual strategy, offering the options. Qantas may reduce some flights, but it is unlikely to completely stop flying via Dubai or Singapore. Similarly, SUA will not cease making a stop at an Asian port just because it has introduced non-stop flights to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Again, if one sees how Dubai International does what Bahrain could not do, reviving the importance of a Middle East hub with convenient connections to Europe and Africa, no less owing to the vast network of Emirates, and how Changi has enticed transit and transfer passengers with being more than just another airport, one can be hopeful of their future. They may even flourish as important regional hubs, feeding traffic from and into the ultra-long haul flights.

And don’t forget, non-stop flights cost more. People spend their dollar in different ways.

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Qantas continues to fly high, confident about the future

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Qantas continues to fly high with new confidence while most other airlines cringe at the prospect of reduced profitability or even losses in the wake of rising fuel prices.

The Australian national carrier posted a record profit of A$1.6 billion (US$1.2 billion) for the year up to June 30, 2018 – 14 per cent higher than last year and 5 per cent higher than the last record profit in 2016. All that despite incurring a fuel bill that increased by almost A$200 million, and which is expected to go up another A$690 million the current year.

Qantas chief Alan Joyce said: “We’re facing another increase to our fuel bill for FY19 and we’re confident that we will substantially recover this through a range of capacity, revenue and cost efficiency measures, in addition to our hedging program.”

The confidence is something of a rarity these days as the fortune of the industry becomes increasingly volatile these days, and most airline leaders choose to be conservative in their forecast moving forward, often citing the uncertainty of the fuel price and, of course, competition.

Qantas has risen to become Asia-Pacific’s – if not the world’s – star performer.

The airline’s performance was boosted by a record profit of A$1.1 billion, up 25 per cent, in the domestic market, achieved through the combination of Qantas and Jetstar’s network, schedule and product strengths in key markets.

Internationally, the airline’s earnings rose7 per cent on the back of a 4-per cent increase in capacity, achieving a load factor of 84 per cent. The new Perth-London route is said to be the highest rating service in its network, and this should cause some concern to its rivals plying the kangaroo route, Singapore Airlines being one of them.

Mr Joyce emphasized that “capacity discipline” was key to Qantas’ success. With strong forward bookings, the airline can certainly afford to be optimistic.

Qantas continues winning streak

It’s happy days again for airlines, more specifically carriers in Asia Pacific which is identified as a growth potential for the industry.

Just over a week ago, Singapore Airlines announced Q3 (Jan-Mar 2018) group profit of S$330 million (US$250 million), increasing by S$37 million or 12.6 per cent (see Singapore Airlines does better without Tigerair, Feb 15, 2018).

Courtesy Qantas

This is now followed by Australia’s Qantas reporting record half year profits (Jul-Dec 2017) of A$976 million (US$761 million), increasing by 14.6 per cent. This came in the face of higher fuel costs, a competitive domestic market and challenges in international capacity growth. The result beat the previous first half record achieved in 2016.

Impressively, Qantas Domestic and budget subsidiary Jetstar’s domestic flying operations combined posted their highest ever first half Underlying EBIT of A$652 million. Qantas controls nearly two-thirds of the Australian market. However, Qantas International, in the words of Qantas chief Alan Joyce, “held its own” with a six per cent decline in profit against a slight increase in revenue.

Mr Joyce remained upbeat about future earnings propsects – the kind of sentiment that is not often expressed by many an airline CEO these days. Surely the airline must be doing something right, and Mr Joyce would remind you that the Transfomration program he introduced in 2014 has certainly borne good fruit.

As Mr Joyce put it, “After several years of turning this business around, Qantas now has a momentum behind it.” He added: “Today’s result comes from investing in areas that provide margin growth and a network strategy that makes sure we have the right aircraft on the right route.”

After Qantas, Air New Zealand is expecting to also announce record profit, boosted by tourism growth.

What Qantas’ strategy shift means for Changi, SIA

http://www.todayonline.com/commentary/what-qantas-strategy-shift-means-changi-sia

Qantas continues to fly high

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Qantas reported another good year ending June 30, 2017. The Australian flag carrier posted a profit of A$852 million (US$67.4 million) – its second highest in the airline’s 97-year history – although it declined by 17.2 per cent compared to last year’s A$1.03 billion.

The question to ask is how Qantas manages to turn in stellar performances when rivals such as Cathay Pacific and Singapore Airlines (SIA) are dipping into losses? Cathay lost HK$585 million (US$103 million) in 2016, and SIA incurred a loss of S$41 million (US$29 million) in Q4 of FY2016/17. (See Cathay Pacific axes 800 jobs: Is this the answer? May 27, 2017)

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce points to the success of the Transformation Program introduced three years ago. The program is now complete with all targets met on time, having achieved asignificant improvement in financial performance, record customer advocacy and record employee engagement. Consequently the airline has incorporated a culture of transformation and continuous improvement goin forward.

“We operate in a very competitive environment, so continuous improvement is crucial,” said Mr Joyce.

The star performer is Qantas Domestic, advantaged by the booming domestic market. It earns an operating margin of 11.5 per cent on revenue of A$5.63 billion. With 90 per cent of the market, it is far ahead of its rival Virgin Australia.

Record earnings were also reported by the Jetstar Group with an operating margin of 11.6 per cent on revenue of A$3.60 billion. Outside Australia, these include Jetstar operations based in Singapore, Japan and Vietnam. The failure to set up base in Hong Kong as a consequence of protest from Cathay and Hong Kong Airlines has not stopped the budget carrier from growing.

Qantas International which used to be the bane of the airline’s financial performance has plowed back into the black in spite of the stiff competition it faces. It posted an operating margin of 5.7 per cent on revenue of A$5.70 billion.

Qantas’ Asian strategy that saw increased capacity to key Asian destinations has proven to be well-timed and placed. The airline will be increasing international capacity by 5 per cent in the first half of FY2017/18, mainly to desinations in the the growing Asian market.

Farther down the road, the airline plans to fly non-stop from Sydney to London and New York by 2022 subject to the availability of aircraft that can travel those long distances. In the near term, Qantas will be flying direct from Perth to London next year. This, said Mr Joyce,“is a huge leap forward” for the flying kangaroo.

Indeed, and it is likely to change the game somewhat, affecting not only would-be erstwhile transit points and competing off-shore airlines which must perforce make those stops. All the more so will airlines now find the need to be creative in influencing the traveller’s preference and enhancing brand loyalty in their marketing effort.

New Qantas safety video: Attraction or distraction?

Courtesy Qantas

Courtesy Qantas

Ever since Air New Zealand made waves breaking away from the conventional in-flight safety video, featuring among other things Middle Earth, a number of other airlines have taken up the challenge to “engage” the travellers, many of them who may find the old style too boring to deserve attention.

The new Qantas video features Australian destinations across every state and territory, ranging from the Victorian ski fields to sand surfing at Queensland’s Moreton Island, thus killing two birds with one stone promoting travel to these destinations at the same time. Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce admits: “This video doubles as a perfect tourism ad.”

While the main goal (as it should be) was to make the safety video “engaging as well as informative,” there are questions about the effectiveness of getting across the primary message as to what to do to keep safe and how to react in the case of an emergency. There is the important question of context. The order of priority in presentation is not necessary received in the same order. And, let’s face it, people get tired of most re-runs soon enough.

Qantas to fly non-stop Perth to London: Shifting the markets

Courtesy Qantas

Courtesy Qantas

FROM four days and nine stops when Qantas first launched its Kangaroo Route from Australia to London to just 17 hours when the airline introduces a non-stop service from Perth in March 2018. The 14,498 km route will be operated by Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner jets, making the world’s longest commercial flights until Singapore Airlines (SIA) launches its 18-hour non-stop service from Singapore to New York’s Newark Airport.

Until Qantas switched to using Dubai International as the hub for its Kangaroo runs in 2013 as part of a mega alliance arrangement with Emirates Airlines, Singapore (Changi Airport and its predecessor) was its traditional stopover point. Now the possibility of non-stop flights raises the relevance of Dubai in the equation, but a Qantas spokesman assured its partner that “Dubai will remain an important hub for onward services into Europe.” Presently Qantas flights from Sydney and Melbourne stop in Dubai for onward connections on Emirates to the rest of Europe with the exception of London.

But at the same time, Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce, referring to the new service as “a game-changing route”, said “the opportunities this opens up are huge.” Dubai will likely feel the same pinch that Singapore once felt as Perth becomes the hub for passengers from eastern Australia to Britain, even beyond. This too may hurt Singapore as a transit point for passengers from Perth. Mr Joyce also expected other direct-to-Europe flights from Australia to follow. The shifts can be significant considering that the UK is a major source of international visitors for Australia. According to Australian tourism minister Steven Ciobo, the UK ranked third with 660,000 visitors in 2015.

Qantas’ new Perth-London non-stop once again demonstrates how the geographical aviation map continues to shift as airlines re-strategize taking advantage of the capability of new technology.