News Update: Emirates reverses decision to suspend all passenger flights

Courtesy AFP

Emirates Airlines reversed an earlier decision to suspend all passenger flights, which was supposed to take effect from March 25.

The Gulf carrier said it had “received requests from government and customers to support the repatriation of travellers.”

It will continue to fly to Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States. This is greatly reduced from its usual 159 destinations.

Singapore Airlines has announced it will cut capacity by 96 per cent to end April, previously planned at 50 per cent.

Jetstar Asia will be grounding its entire fleet from March 23 to April 15.

Quick changes across the globe are expected, demonstrating the uncertainty that is gripping the industry.

Emirates suspends all passenger flights: Will the global industry grind to a standstill?

Courtesy Reuters

Emirates Airlines becomes the first carrier to announce complete suspension of all passenger flights. This will take effect on Wednesday, March 25 when its entire passenger fleet will be grounded. The airline has already cut back capacity by 70 per cent.

It is not just that more people are refraining from travel for fear of contracting the coronavirus, more countries are beginning to ban travel by foreigners into their ports. Consequently airlines are flying empty seats. And especially for airlines which rely on transiting and connecting traffic such as Emirates, this takes a heavy toll on their business.

Emirates chairman Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed al-Maktoum said: “As a global network airline, we find ourselves in a situation where we cannot viably operate passenger services until countries reopen their borders and travel confidence returns.”

Is this a sign of more airlines following suit, notwithstanding those which are already teetering on the line facing bankruptcy?

Other major carriers which rely heavily on similar traffic as Emirates include Singapore Airlines (SIA) and Cathay Pacific.

SIA has reduced capacity by 50 per cent to the end of April. Further reduction is not off the table. The airline attributed this to “the growing scale of border controls”. SIA CEO Goh Choon Phong said: “We have lost a large amount of our traffic in a very short time, and it will not be viable for us to maintain our current network.”

Cathay too has made deep capacity cuts, particularly to mainland China as high as 90 per cent.

For the premium Hong Kong carrier, it is a double whammy as it moves from an embattled 2019 into an uncertain 2020. Profits plummeted in 2019 caused by the political unrest in the latter half of the year. The full year profit was HK$1.7 billion (US$220 million), down by 26 per cent from HK$2.3 billion in 2018.

Looking ahead, the airline said in a statement that “the outbreak of COVID-19 since January 2020 has resulted in a challenging operational environment, and will adversely impact the Group’s financial performance and liquidity position.” Cathay chairman Patrick Healy added, “We expect to incur a substantial loss for the first half of 2020.”

While some carriers may fall by the wayside, it is however unthinkable that the global airline industry will grant to a halt. Some governments are already promising reliefs to help them pull through. Nobody can say for sure when normalcy will return while acknowledging it is anything but foreseeable.

At last, Emirates will be offering premium economy

Courtesy EPA

Emirates Airlines is the latest of the few remaining major airlines to jump on the premium economy bandwagon. The Gulf carrier is launching the service in 2020. And as one of the world’s best airlines according to several surveys, it promises a product as one to beat.

Emirates CEO Tim Clark said, “We’re aiming to make it a quiet zone, a comfortable zone.”

It will be an exclusive cabin. Besides more legroom, better food and beverages, and other perks, the seat will be a “sleeperette”, but it will not be a lie-flat bed as in Business Class. The idea is to attract economy class passengers to upgrade. And Mr Clark has said the prices will be “well below business class fares.”

Emirates’ entry into this segment of the business will certainly heighten the competition among rival airlines that are already offering premium economy. A noted rival is Singapore Airlines (SIA). Interestingly, Emirates seems to be following in the footsteps of SIA which held out for quite a while before it decided to fly premium economy behind several other major carriers such as Cathay Pacific and Qantas. Both SIA and Emirates are known for their excellent service in the upper classes, but they cannot ignore the growing appeal of that in-between class that their close rivals ride on.

Closer home, it may not be a question now as to whether Qatar Airways and Etihad Airways will also come on board but when

2019 Skytrax World Airline Awards: Who are the real winners?

It’s that time of the year when the airline industry is abuzz with the Skytrax World Airline Awards announced recently at the Paris Air Show.

There are surveys and there are surveys, if you know what I mean. Skytrax, which launched its survey back in 1999 (according to its website) is generally viewed with some regard. It is said that more than 21 million respondents participated in the 2019 survey.

But what can we read of the results?

Which is the real winner: Qatar Airways or Singapore Airlines?

Qatar Airways switched places with last year winner Singapore Airlines (SIA) to be the world’s best airline.

As far back as 2010 until now, the two airlines have been ranked one behind the other in the top three spots, except in 2012 when Asiana came in second place between Qatar the winner and SIA in third position. In the ten year period, SIA came behind Qatar in eight years, except in 2010 when SIA was second and Qatar third, and last year when the Singapore carrier became the world’s best ahead of Qatar in second placing.

It looks like a tight race between Qatar and SIA for the top spot, and going by the survey results, Qatar has outranked SIA. It has become the first airline to have won the award five times, one more in the history of the awards.

But SIA is still ranked ahead of Qatar for first class and economy class.

In the first class category, Qatar is not even a close second to SIA in first placing but fifth behind Lufthansa, Air France and Etihad as well

In the economy class category, Japan Airlines is tops followed by SIA and Qatar in second and third placing respectively.

Besides SIA has the best premium economy in Asia, second only to Virgin Atlantic worldwide. But,of course, Qatar does not offer that class of travel.

Additionally SIA tops for cabin crew, and Qatar is farther down the list in 9th position.

But Qatar wins for business class, followed by ANA and SIA in second and third placing respectively. So it seems there is heavier weightage for this segment which has become probably the fiercest battleground for the airlines. First class included, it also suggests the halo effect of the premium product, but it is the business class that is the primary focus in today’s business.

It also attests to the impact of the recency factor. Qatar obviously impresses with its cubicle-like Qsuite that comes with its own door to provide maximum privacy. Quad configurations allow businessmen to engage in conference as if they were in a meeting room and families to share their own private space. And there is a double bed option.

Which brings up the importance of having to continually innovate and upgrade the product to stay ahead in the race.

The top ten listing: Consistency equals excellence

The ranking does not shift much from year to year. Besides Qatar and SIA, there are some familiar names: All Nippon Airways (3rd this year), Cathay Pacific (4th), Emirates (5th), EVA Air (6th) and Lufthansa (9th). So there is not much of a big deal as airlines switch places so long as they remain in the premier list.

Hainan Airlines (7th) is making good progress, moving up one notch every year since 2017. Qantas (8th) is less consistent, moving in and out of the top ten list, Thai Airways retained its 10th spot for a second year.

It is no surprise that the list continues to be dominated by Asian carriers which are generally reputed for service. You only need to look at the winners for best cabin crew: Besides SIA, the list is made up of Garuda Indonesia, ANA, Thai Airways, EVA Air, Cathay Pacific, Hainan Airlines, Japan Airlines and China Airlines. With the exception of Qatar, no other airline outside Asia is listed.

If you to look to find out how the United States carriers are performing, scroll down the extended list of the 100 best and you will see JetBlue Airways (40th), Delta Air Lines (41st), Southwest Airlines (47th), Alaska Airlines (54th), United Airlines (68th) and American Airlines (74th).

Home and regional rivalry

Rivalry between major home airlines or among competing regional carriers is often closely watched.

Air Canada, placed 31st ahead of rival WestJet at 55th can boast it is the best in North America. That’s how you can work the survey results to your advantage.

ANA (3rd) has consistently outdone arch rival JAL (11th). In fact, ANA has been the favoured airline in the past decade till now. It has Japan’s best airline staff and best cabin crew. Across Asia, it provides the best business class. Internationally, it provides the best airport services and business class onboard catering.

Asiana (28th) is favoured over Korean Air (35th ).

The big three Gulf carriers are ranked Qatar first, followed by Emirates (5th) and Etihad (29th).

Among the European carriers, Lufthansa (9th) leads the field, followed by Swiss International Air Lines (13th), Austrian Airlines (15th), KLM (18th), British Airways (19th), Virgin Atlantic (21st), Aeroflot (22nd), Air France (23rd), Iberia (26th) and Finnair (32nd).

What about low-cost carriers?

Worthy of note is how some budget carriers are ranked not far behind legacy airlines. AirAsia (20th) is best among cohorts. EasyJet (37th) and Norwegian Air Shuttle (39th) are not far behind the big guys in Europe. Among US carriers, Southwest Airlines (47th) is third after JetBlue (40th) and Delta (41st).

Also, pedigree parents do not necessarily produce top-ranked offshoots. Placed farther down the list are SIA’s subsidiary Scoot (64th) and the two Jetstar subsidiaries of Qantas – Jetstar Airways (53rd) and Jetstar Asia (81st). So too may be said of so-called regional arms. Cathay Pacific’s Cathay Dragon is ranked 33rd, but SIA’s SilkAir is way down at 62nd.

Pioneer of the modern budget model Ryanair is ranked 59th.

Down the slippery road of decline: Aisana Airlines and Etihad Airways

If it is difficult to stay at the top, it is easy to slip down the slippery road of decline. Asiana and Etihad are two examples.

Asiana was ranked world’s best airline in 2010 and became a familiar name in the top ten list up to 2014, after which its ranking kept falling: 11th (2015), 16th (2016), 20th (2017), 24th (2018) and 28th (2019). Its erstwhile glory has been whittled down to being just best cabin crew in South Korea.

Etihad did reasonably well for eight years until 2018 when it was ranked 15th, and a year later suffered a dramatic decline to the 29th spot. That, despite beating Qatar to be this year’s best first class in the Middle East.

As I stated at the onset that there are surveys and there are surveys. Some are not specifically targeted , whether its interest is business or leisure for example. There is always an element of subjectivity and bias in the composition and weightage, and this renders no one reading as being definitive. At best, we can read across several creditable surveys to know with some conviction how the airlines really measure against each other.

Read also:

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/can-singapore-airlines-overtake-qatar-worlds-best-airline

Size matters in the air

Courtesy Getty Images

Ryanair chief Michael O’Leary predicted that “within the next four to five years you are seeing the emergence of four or five large European airline groups.” He even named the airlines, Ryanair among them in a mix of full-service and low-cost operators: Lufthansa, IAG (International Airlines Group which owns British Airways, Iberia, Aer Lingus, Vueling and Level), Air France-KLM and, probably, Easyjet.

This sentiment has been opined before by others at a time when mergers, assimilations and acquisitions across the industry were trending as competition broke barriers of entry and intensified, and so-called safe niche markets became every player’s game.

Air France-KLM as the name suggests is a merger of the two European airlines in 2004. Rival British Airways (BA) viewed it as a step in the expected direction, predicting further consolidation within Europe. And in 2011 IAG came into being when BA and Iberia merged. BA chief executive Willie Walsh said at the time that the merger would enable the airline to compete effectively with low-cost carriers.

So there came a time when budget carriers began to pose a threat to full-service airlines, with Ryanair leading the pack. Many of the legacy airlines today have adopted the budget model of charging for ancillaries, and introducing a basic economy class to keep cost-conscious travellers from switching. However, many low-cost carriers have become victims of the competition – the reason why Mr O’Leary named only one other carrier, EasyJet, as a probable survivor.

EasyJet, founded in 1995 and headquartered in London Luton, UK, is Ryanair’s closest rival which has grown and spread its wings across Europe. It too has made a number of acquisitions which include Swiss TEA-Basle and Go.
Elsewhere around the world, the vibes are not unfamiliar, New in the circuit is Air Canada’s interest in Sunwing and Cathay Pacific’s interest in Air Hong Kong Express, And where acquisitions and mergers are not on the plate, airlines are working to form alliances that are more than mere code-sharing. Qantas did it in 2013 with its tie-up with Emirates, and now Malaysia Airlines and Japan Airlines have applied for waiver of government restrictions to form an alliance that will enable easier connections between the two carriers.

It looks like size matters in the air.

Emirates’ profit plunges: Are the good days over?

Courtesy EPA

Emirates Airlines posted its weakest earnings in a decade – its profit at Dh871m (US$237m) plunged 69 per cent for the year ending March 31.

The airline’s chairman Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum attributed the lacklustre performance to higher oil prices, competition, weakening of travel demand particularly in the Gulf region, and strengthening of the US dollar.

Was 2018/19 merely an exceptionally tough year, or is it a sign that the good days are coming to an end?

Emirates has been very successful in operating inter-continental flights, hubbing at Dubai International Airport. However, with more airlines mounting direct flights, Emirates may face the challenge to fill up its fleet of A380 superjumbo. Its reliance on Asia-Pacific traffic to connect through Dubai to Europe has also been affected by the spread of terrorist attacks that are turning travellers away.

Going forward, Sheik Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum said: “We expect the year ahead to remain challenging with hyper competition squeezing airline yields, and volatility in many markets impacting travel flows and demand.”

Interestingly, Emirates will be introducing a premium-economy class next year to help broaden its appeal. Known to have modelled itself after Singapore Airlines (SIA) in its early years of formation, Emirates is going through the same kind of pain that SIA experienced. And a little lately. SIA had for some time fought shy of going the premium-economy way, and is now competing aggressively to lead the pack.

The danger with success is how one thinks the good days will never come to an end so long as one continues to do what one has been doing. We forget that things are constantly changing around us.

Emirates’ profit plunge may signal something wider in the Gulf region. Last year Qatar Airways reported a loss of 252m riyals (US$67m), attributing it largely to a political dispute that resulted in a ban on the airline by Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain. It expects to make a loss again this year.

Etihad Airways too has been incurring losses since 2016. Last year it posted a loss of US$1.28b. The Abu Dhabi-based airline has since shifted its focus on acquiring stakes in other airlines to build up its intercontinental network to focusing on operating point-to-point flights. There is rumour that it may eventually be assimilated by rival Emirates.

So true it is that one’s fortune may change depending on how and where the wind blows. You can’t ever rest on your laurels.

News Update: Emirates’ cancellation spells end for A380 production

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-47231504#

Courtesy EPA