A New Beginning for Boeing?

It has certainly been a bad year for Boeing, following the grounding of the B737 MAX jet in March after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people.

Boeing had hoped that the jet would be put back into service before the end of the year, but of course is out of the question now. While some remain hopeful of a late January or February date, many airlines are now resigned to it being longer. American Airlines, for one, has moved schedules for its likely operations to April, to avoid disruptions.

One thing clear is that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is asserting (or resuming) control of the situation after the bad press of lax oversight. FAA has said it will take all the time that it needs to ensure that the the MAX is safe. It said in a statement that “the agency will not approve the aircraft for return to service until it has completed numerous rounds of rigorous testing.”

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson has made it clear that “the FAA fully controls the approval process” and will not rush the certification at the request of Boeing.

News reports about the shoddy work at the Boeing plants continue to damage the manufacturer’s credibility. In October, one of the company’s employees was said to have misled the FAA about the Max’s MCAS anti-stall technology, that he had “basically lied” to the regulator. That raised more alarm bells.

Courtesy CNBC

There has been a lot of pressure on Boeing CEO Dennis Mullenberg to resign his post, not least from the US Congress. But Mullenberg held on with the support of the Board of Directors, which conceded a little by stripping him of his Chairman title but continued to express confidence in his leadership. They were to finally fully concede as Congress questioned among other things why Mullenberg hasn’t given up his pay (US$23 million in 2018) and suggested that the buck should stop with him in “a culture of negligence, incompetence and corruption”.

Mullenberg is stepping down with immediate effect, to be succeeded by the current chairman David Calhoun who will on January 13 assume the CEO post as well. In the interim, CFO Greg Smith will be at the helm.

In a statement issued by Boeing, “the Board of Directors decided that a change in leadership was necessary to restore confidence in the Company moving forward as it works to repair relationships with regulators, customers, and all other stakeholders.”

Could this have come earlier? No use looking back, but if it was a clean break that Boeing was looking to make, it had dragged its feet. For too long, the saga continued to hang over its shoulder like the albatross of Coleridge’s ancient mariner.

The uncertainty of the delay in putting the MAX back into service has forced the company to suspend production of the aircraft. Confidence in the company is slipping, and whether Qantas’ decision to pick pick Airbus over Boeing to fly the world’s longest route from Sydney to London is an indication of this or not, the timing doesn’t help. Worse, the problems of the MAX have coloured the traveller’s perception of the other jets in the same family. Boeing knows only too well that satisfying the regulator and customer airlines of the MAX’s safety is one thing, but regaining the confidence of travellers is another, which may turn out to be a greater hurdle.

Now with Mullenberg’s resignation, will the new year mark a clean break for Boeing? Seems aptly so if it could clean out whatever else is left of the skeletons in its cupboard.