Japan Airlines eyes a bigger slice of budget market

Courtesy Reuters

It is taking Japan Airlines (JAL) a long time to launch a budget subsidiary, but it’s never too late if the budget market continues to grow. One may say that the Japanese carrier is treading with extreme caution, and even if the economic arguments are no stronger now than before, there can be no better reason than the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 for the belated introduction.

At home, rival All Nippon Airways (ANA) has been operating two budget carriers, namely Peach and Vanilla (which was the rebirth of a failed joint venture with AirAsia), and has plans to merge the two carriers in preparation for medium-haul international flights.

Foreign low-cost competitors include AirAsia, Singapore Airlines’ Scoot and Hong Kong Express. And, of course, there is Jetstar, the budget arm of Qantas, in which JAL has a minority share. It is therefore not exactly correct to say that the Japanese national carrier has not tapped into the budget market earlier, though not in as big a way as the others.

The yet-to-be-named budget carrier, to be based at Narita International Airport, will commence operations with two jets in mid-2020, offering medium and long-haul flights to Asia, Europe and the Americas. It will operate to some of the destinations already served by JAL.

The timing cannot be coincidental, as this is when ANA is expanding the operations of Peach into the international market. Until then, JAL seems quite content that the competition is limited to the domestic market, but with Peach offering another option for loyal Japanese travellers besides others to fly beyond and into Japan at lower fares, it cannot be taken lightly.

The budget market in Asia is a growing business. JAL director Masaru Onishi said the airline will cater to a broad group of Japanese and foreign passengers, and will take a more experimental approach to its product than the full-service parent carrier. There will be a mix of budget and premium options for meals and seats. The airline aims to be profitable within three years.

JAL may be Johnny-come-lately, but it has ambitious plans for its budget offspring. The competition is set to intensify, not just with compatriot ANA but also with other foreign carriers.