What’s behind the partnership between Singapore Airlines and Malaysia Airlines?

This article was published in Today on 26 November 2019

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/whats-behind-partnership-between-singapore-airlines-and-malaysia-airlines

Protecting the consumer rights of air travellers

This article was published in Today, 25 October 2019.

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/protecting-consumer-rights-air-travellers

Can AirAsia save Malaysia Airlines?

Courtesy Reuters

Back in March, AirAsia chief Tony Fernandes said he was not keen on acquiring Malaysia Airlines (MAS).

This came amidst speculation of a likely scenario when Malaysian Prime Minister Mahatir Mohamad mulled over the future of the beleaguered flag carrier, suggesting it might be better off sold if not downsized or expanded as the case may be with a change of management.

Dr Mahatir said: “Although we hired foreign management, MAS still faced losses. Therefore, one of the options is to sell.”

Four turnaround initiatives without success had apparently cost the government MYR250 billion (USD 6.05 billion).

Recent events have led to renewed speculation of AirAsia’s interest. Former AirAsia Group Bhd non-executive chairman Pahamin Rajab is said to have met Dr Mahatir. However, it might well point to Mr Pahamin’s personal interest eyeing the top job at Malaysia Airlines following the resignation of Tan Sri Mohammed Nor Md Yusof as chairman.

But if the acquisition does come about, it would be an interesting case of how a budget carrier came to assimilate a larger national carrier. AirAsia, once itself heavily indebted, had become Asia’s leading budget carrier.

There are clear benefits of such a merger. The two carriers can complement their networks and not compete as rivals on the same routes given AirAsia’s ambition to expand into the long-haul market, unless the products differ substantially in their make-up. This can be modelled after the likes of Singapore Airlines-Scoot and Qantas-Jetstar complement.

The execution is key. The industry has seen one too many examples of assimilation by a legacy carrier of a low-cost operator. For AirAsia, the big question must be one of how its operating culture will mesh with that of MAS, noting in particular that its success lies in the austere budget model although this does not imply it is not inclined to be service-bias.

One can’t help but wonder how and why MAS has failed to change in spite of earlier initiatives at restructuring, so much said about cost-cutting and perhaps not enough focus on the operating culture. So can AirAsia work the magic?

But, of course, only if Mr Fernandes wanted it. He had said: “For low-cost carriers to go full-service… is a mistake.” He had also called Malaysia Airlines “old-fashioned”. For him, the priority is to transform AirAsia into a “travel technology company”. In his words, to be “more than just an airline”.

The real question then is: Is MAS ready for the transformation?

2019 Skytrax World Airline Awards: Who are the real winners?

It’s that time of the year when the airline industry is abuzz with the Skytrax World Airline Awards announced recently at the Paris Air Show.

There are surveys and there are surveys, if you know what I mean. Skytrax, which launched its survey back in 1999 (according to its website) is generally viewed with some regard. It is said that more than 21 million respondents participated in the 2019 survey.

But what can we read of the results?

Which is the real winner: Qatar Airways or Singapore Airlines?

Qatar Airways switched places with last year winner Singapore Airlines (SIA) to be the world’s best airline.

As far back as 2010 until now, the two airlines have been ranked one behind the other in the top three spots, except in 2012 when Asiana came in second place between Qatar the winner and SIA in third position. In the ten year period, SIA came behind Qatar in eight years, except in 2010 when SIA was second and Qatar third, and last year when the Singapore carrier became the world’s best ahead of Qatar in second placing.

It looks like a tight race between Qatar and SIA for the top spot, and going by the survey results, Qatar has outranked SIA. It has become the first airline to have won the award five times, one more in the history of the awards.

But SIA is still ranked ahead of Qatar for first class and economy class.

In the first class category, Qatar is not even a close second to SIA in first placing but fifth behind Lufthansa, Air France and Etihad as well

In the economy class category, Japan Airlines is tops followed by SIA and Qatar in second and third placing respectively.

Besides SIA has the best premium economy in Asia, second only to Virgin Atlantic worldwide. But,of course, Qatar does not offer that class of travel.

Additionally SIA tops for cabin crew, and Qatar is farther down the list in 9th position.

But Qatar wins for business class, followed by ANA and SIA in second and third placing respectively. So it seems there is heavier weightage for this segment which has become probably the fiercest battleground for the airlines. First class included, it also suggests the halo effect of the premium product, but it is the business class that is the primary focus in today’s business.

It also attests to the impact of the recency factor. Qatar obviously impresses with its cubicle-like Qsuite that comes with its own door to provide maximum privacy. Quad configurations allow businessmen to engage in conference as if they were in a meeting room and families to share their own private space. And there is a double bed option.

Which brings up the importance of having to continually innovate and upgrade the product to stay ahead in the race.

The top ten listing: Consistency equals excellence

The ranking does not shift much from year to year. Besides Qatar and SIA, there are some familiar names: All Nippon Airways (3rd this year), Cathay Pacific (4th), Emirates (5th), EVA Air (6th) and Lufthansa (9th). So there is not much of a big deal as airlines switch places so long as they remain in the premier list.

Hainan Airlines (7th) is making good progress, moving up one notch every year since 2017. Qantas (8th) is less consistent, moving in and out of the top ten list, Thai Airways retained its 10th spot for a second year.

It is no surprise that the list continues to be dominated by Asian carriers which are generally reputed for service. You only need to look at the winners for best cabin crew: Besides SIA, the list is made up of Garuda Indonesia, ANA, Thai Airways, EVA Air, Cathay Pacific, Hainan Airlines, Japan Airlines and China Airlines. With the exception of Qatar, no other airline outside Asia is listed.

If you to look to find out how the United States carriers are performing, scroll down the extended list of the 100 best and you will see JetBlue Airways (40th), Delta Air Lines (41st), Southwest Airlines (47th), Alaska Airlines (54th), United Airlines (68th) and American Airlines (74th).

Home and regional rivalry

Rivalry between major home airlines or among competing regional carriers is often closely watched.

Air Canada, placed 31st ahead of rival WestJet at 55th can boast it is the best in North America. That’s how you can work the survey results to your advantage.

ANA (3rd) has consistently outdone arch rival JAL (11th). In fact, ANA has been the favoured airline in the past decade till now. It has Japan’s best airline staff and best cabin crew. Across Asia, it provides the best business class. Internationally, it provides the best airport services and business class onboard catering.

Asiana (28th) is favoured over Korean Air (35th ).

The big three Gulf carriers are ranked Qatar first, followed by Emirates (5th) and Etihad (29th).

Among the European carriers, Lufthansa (9th) leads the field, followed by Swiss International Air Lines (13th), Austrian Airlines (15th), KLM (18th), British Airways (19th), Virgin Atlantic (21st), Aeroflot (22nd), Air France (23rd), Iberia (26th) and Finnair (32nd).

What about low-cost carriers?

Worthy of note is how some budget carriers are ranked not far behind legacy airlines. AirAsia (20th) is best among cohorts. EasyJet (37th) and Norwegian Air Shuttle (39th) are not far behind the big guys in Europe. Among US carriers, Southwest Airlines (47th) is third after JetBlue (40th) and Delta (41st).

Also, pedigree parents do not necessarily produce top-ranked offshoots. Placed farther down the list are SIA’s subsidiary Scoot (64th) and the two Jetstar subsidiaries of Qantas – Jetstar Airways (53rd) and Jetstar Asia (81st). So too may be said of so-called regional arms. Cathay Pacific’s Cathay Dragon is ranked 33rd, but SIA’s SilkAir is way down at 62nd.

Pioneer of the modern budget model Ryanair is ranked 59th.

Down the slippery road of decline: Aisana Airlines and Etihad Airways

If it is difficult to stay at the top, it is easy to slip down the slippery road of decline. Asiana and Etihad are two examples.

Asiana was ranked world’s best airline in 2010 and became a familiar name in the top ten list up to 2014, after which its ranking kept falling: 11th (2015), 16th (2016), 20th (2017), 24th (2018) and 28th (2019). Its erstwhile glory has been whittled down to being just best cabin crew in South Korea.

Etihad did reasonably well for eight years until 2018 when it was ranked 15th, and a year later suffered a dramatic decline to the 29th spot. That, despite beating Qatar to be this year’s best first class in the Middle East.

As I stated at the onset that there are surveys and there are surveys. Some are not specifically targeted , whether its interest is business or leisure for example. There is always an element of subjectivity and bias in the composition and weightage, and this renders no one reading as being definitive. At best, we can read across several creditable surveys to know with some conviction how the airlines really measure against each other.

Read also:

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/can-singapore-airlines-overtake-qatar-worlds-best-airline

Never say never: Cathay Pacific enters budget market

Courtesy AFP

In 2015, Cathay Pacific together with Hong Kong Airlines opposed Qantas’ application to set up Jetstar Hong Kong Airways – co-owned with China Eastern Airlines and billionaire Stanley Ho’s Shun Tak Holdings Ltd. Cathay was particularly vehement about there being no room or need for budget travel in Hong Kong. The authorities were convinced and Jetstar HKG never took off.

Today, Cathay announced its decision to buy Hong Kong’s only budget carrier, Hong Kong Express Airways, for HK$4.93 billion (US$628 million). This expands Cathay’s stable of airlines to three, which includes regional carrier Cathay Dragon. It will boost Cathay’s market share to 50 per cent in Hong Kong.

A Cathay spokesperson said: “We intend to continue to operate Hong Kong Express as a stand-alone airline using the low-cost carrier business model.”

Now what caused Cathay to change its mind?

Cathay is not alone in facing stiff competition in the long-haul and premium market, from not only neighbouring rivals such as Singapore Airlines (SIA) but also Middle east carriers such as Dubai Airlines. Besides, Chinese carriers from mainland China are also fast expanding, flying direct and more services to Europe and North America.

At the same time, Cathay can no longer ignore the encroachment by the flourish of budget carriers in the region, particularly those operating out of mainland China. The Hong Kong authorities too may begin to realise how all this may be reducing Hong Kong International Airport’s hub status, particularly when limited options are resulting in Hong Kong being bypassed.

It could be a matter of timing. In 2017 Cathay reported its first annual net loss in eight years and introduced a three-year transformation program. It was later in that same year that Cathay CEO Rupert Hogg affirmed that Cathay had no plans to start a low-cost carrier. But the debt-ridden HNA Group which owns Hong Kong Express offers a timely opportunity not to be missed even as Cathay posted its first full year profit in 2018 of US$299 million.

The business climate can change fairly quickly, but unfortunately airlines may be slow in catching up with the changes because of the huge investment and lead time to implement many of the changes, apart from a host of other reasons, some of which could be largely circumstantial.

Many legacy airlines pooh-poohed the threat of budget airlines to their traditional market when it was first mooted, and as many of the carriers fell by the wayside before they could assert any impact.

SIA for one came on the scene later than most others, setting up Tigerair jointly with Ryanair, and then Scoot. Its strategy has changed yet again with the merger of Tigerair and Scoot, and now SIA is in the process of assimilating SilkAir into the parent airline.

One wonders if this is the path that Cathay may take should Hong Kong Express and Cathay Dragon find their services overlap as they expand.

Whatever the reading, it would be discreet to never say never. The question is always if so, when?

Time to address rights of travellers affected by lengthy flight delays

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/time-address-rights-air-travellers-affected-lengthy-delays?cid=emarsys-today_TODAY%27s%20evening%20briefing%20for%20Jan%207,%202019%20%28ACTIVE%29_newsletter_07012019_today

Singapore Airlines spreads its wings wider across the US

Courtesy Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines (SIA)’s catchy “seamless to Seattle” byline echoes the popular Hollywood movie title “Sleepless in Seattle” starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan as it announces plans to launch a non-stop service to the Washington state gateway in north western USA. Flight time is estimated at 16 hours 30 minutes. Mark the date: 3 September 2019.

Seattle will be SIA’s fifth US city in the airline’s network after San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York and Houston. It is also the fourth city to be served non-stop from Singapore. Houston is served via Manchester in the United Kingdom (UK), the first connection between the US and the UK for the airline, which has historically been fighting hard to secure rights to cross the pond from Britain; its initial interest was to fly from London to New York.

Clearly the Singapore carrier is spreading its wings wider across the US. Based on current schedules, the Seattle service will increase SIA’s operations to 57 flights weekly. In the early days, the airline also flew to Honolulu; today, that destination is served by its budget subsidiary Scoot.

Strategically, SIA is well placed in the major hub cities, serving almost the four corners of the US. Seattle is a good bet as a western gateway into the heart of the US, particularly when it can also leverage on the wide network of Alaska Airlines in their partnership. Seattle is also a hop away from Vancouver in western Canada which SIA used to serve but may now use Seattle as the alternative.

At home, Changi Airport’s hub status will be enhanced by SIA’s success to channel traffic through the airport to regional destinations.

As SIA pushes more into the US, you may wonder which other cities are also on its radar. Will it be Chicago next? Too early to think about it? Not quite, in this business. And if you think Seattle is some ten months away, according to the SIA website, flights will be available for booking from 18 November 2018.