2019 Skytrax World Airline Awards: Who are the real winners?

It’s that time of the year when the airline industry is abuzz with the Skytrax World Airline Awards announced recently at the Paris Air Show.

There are surveys and there are surveys, if you know what I mean. Skytrax, which launched its survey back in 1999 (according to its website) is generally viewed with some regard. It is said that more than 21 million respondents participated in the 2019 survey.

But what can we read of the results?

Which is the real winner: Qatar Airways or Singapore Airlines?

Qatar Airways switched places with last year winner Singapore Airlines (SIA) to be the world’s best airline.

As far back as 2010 until now, the two airlines have been ranked one behind the other in the top three spots, except in 2012 when Asiana came in second place between Qatar the winner and SIA in third position. In the ten year period, SIA came behind Qatar in eight years, except in 2010 when SIA was second and Qatar third, and last year when the Singapore carrier became the world’s best ahead of Qatar in second placing.

It looks like a tight race between Qatar and SIA for the top spot, and going by the survey results, Qatar has outranked SIA. It has become the first airline to have won the award five times, one more in the history of the awards.

But SIA is still ranked ahead of Qatar for first class and economy class.

In the first class category, Qatar is not even a close second to SIA in first placing but fifth behind Lufthansa, Air France and Etihad as well

In the economy class category, Japan Airlines is tops followed by SIA and Qatar in second and third placing respectively.

Besides SIA has the best premium economy in Asia, second only to Virgin Atlantic worldwide. But,of course, Qatar does not offer that class of travel.

Additionally SIA tops for cabin crew, and Qatar is farther down the list in 9th position.

But Qatar wins for business class, followed by ANA and SIA in second and third placing respectively. So it seems there is heavier weightage for this segment which has become probably the fiercest battleground for the airlines. First class included, it also suggests the halo effect of the premium product, but it is the business class that is the primary focus in today’s business.

It also attests to the impact of the recency factor. Qatar obviously impresses with its cubicle-like Qsuite that comes with its own door to provide maximum privacy. Quad configurations allow businessmen to engage in conference as if they were in a meeting room and families to share their own private space. And there is a double bed option.

Which brings up the importance of having to continually innovate and upgrade the product to stay ahead in the race.

The top ten listing: Consistency equals excellence

The ranking does not shift much from year to year. Besides Qatar and SIA, there are some familiar names: All Nippon Airways (3rd this year), Cathay Pacific (4th), Emirates (5th), EVA Air (6th) and Lufthansa (9th). So there is not much of a big deal as airlines switch places so long as they remain in the premier list.

Hainan Airlines (7th) is making good progress, moving up one notch every year since 2017. Qantas (8th) is less consistent, moving in and out of the top ten list, Thai Airways retained its 10th spot for a second year.

It is no surprise that the list continues to be dominated by Asian carriers which are generally reputed for service. You only need to look at the winners for best cabin crew: Besides SIA, the list is made up of Garuda Indonesia, ANA, Thai Airways, EVA Air, Cathay Pacific, Hainan Airlines, Japan Airlines and China Airlines. With the exception of Qatar, no other airline outside Asia is listed.

If you to look to find out how the United States carriers are performing, scroll down the extended list of the 100 best and you will see JetBlue Airways (40th), Delta Air Lines (41st), Southwest Airlines (47th), Alaska Airlines (54th), United Airlines (68th) and American Airlines (74th).

Home and regional rivalry

Rivalry between major home airlines or among competing regional carriers is often closely watched.

Air Canada, placed 31st ahead of rival WestJet at 55th can boast it is the best in North America. That’s how you can work the survey results to your advantage.

ANA (3rd) has consistently outdone arch rival JAL (11th). In fact, ANA has been the favoured airline in the past decade till now. It has Japan’s best airline staff and best cabin crew. Across Asia, it provides the best business class. Internationally, it provides the best airport services and business class onboard catering.

Asiana (28th) is favoured over Korean Air (35th ).

The big three Gulf carriers are ranked Qatar first, followed by Emirates (5th) and Etihad (29th).

Among the European carriers, Lufthansa (9th) leads the field, followed by Swiss International Air Lines (13th), Austrian Airlines (15th), KLM (18th), British Airways (19th), Virgin Atlantic (21st), Aeroflot (22nd), Air France (23rd), Iberia (26th) and Finnair (32nd).

What about low-cost carriers?

Worthy of note is how some budget carriers are ranked not far behind legacy airlines. AirAsia (20th) is best among cohorts. EasyJet (37th) and Norwegian Air Shuttle (39th) are not far behind the big guys in Europe. Among US carriers, Southwest Airlines (47th) is third after JetBlue (40th) and Delta (41st).

Also, pedigree parents do not necessarily produce top-ranked offshoots. Placed farther down the list are SIA’s subsidiary Scoot (64th) and the two Jetstar subsidiaries of Qantas – Jetstar Airways (53rd) and Jetstar Asia (81st). So too may be said of so-called regional arms. Cathay Pacific’s Cathay Dragon is ranked 33rd, but SIA’s SilkAir is way down at 62nd.

Pioneer of the modern budget model Ryanair is ranked 59th.

Down the slippery road of decline: Aisana Airlines and Etihad Airways

If it is difficult to stay at the top, it is easy to slip down the slippery road of decline. Asiana and Etihad are two examples.

Asiana was ranked world’s best airline in 2010 and became a familiar name in the top ten list up to 2014, after which its ranking kept falling: 11th (2015), 16th (2016), 20th (2017), 24th (2018) and 28th (2019). Its erstwhile glory has been whittled down to being just best cabin crew in South Korea.

Etihad did reasonably well for eight years until 2018 when it was ranked 15th, and a year later suffered a dramatic decline to the 29th spot. That, despite beating Qatar to be this year’s best first class in the Middle East.

As I stated at the onset that there are surveys and there are surveys. Some are not specifically targeted , whether its interest is business or leisure for example. There is always an element of subjectivity and bias in the composition and weightage, and this renders no one reading as being definitive. At best, we can read across several creditable surveys to know with some conviction how the airlines really measure against each other.

Read also:

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/can-singapore-airlines-overtake-qatar-worlds-best-airline

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Is the Boeing Max ready to fly?

Courtesy Boeing

Airlines looking forward to fly their fleet of Boeing B737 Max 8 aircraft have just got their planned schedules jiggered up by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s announcement that it may take up to a year before the jet is cleared again for commercial flights.

According to the BBC, FAA chief Daniel Elwell said: “If it takes a year to find everything we need to give us the confidence to lift the (grounding) order so be it.”

It may be read that underlying this is the FAA’s understanding that time is needed to regain the world’s trust – in both the aircraft and the FAA as regulator. While Boeing seems ready to sign off the improved jet, saying it has finished updating the pertinent flight-control software, FAA in an apparent redeeming move following censure of its lax oversight is assuming control as the final authority to certify the jet’s safety.

According to Bloomberg, Mr Elwell added at a meeting with representation from across the globe, “If there is a crisis in confidence, we hope this will help to show the world that the world still talks together about aviation safety issues.”

In Boeing’s favour, some airlines have voiced their support of the Max. Understandably so, particularly if the airline owns a sizeable fleet of the jet. American Airlines (AA) for one is confident of an “absolute fix” but CEO Doug Parker was also quick to add, “But…it’s not for us to decide whether or not the aircraft flies. It needs to be safe for everyone.” The airline, which has a fleet of 24 Max jets, has cancelled thousands of flights and has now cancelled Max schedules through mid-August.

Another airline which has pledged its commitment to Boeing is Singapore Airlines (SIA). The airline is pledging its commitment to purchase 39 Dreamliner jets and its re-commitment for a previous order of 30 planes. Although this is not related to the Max aircraft of which its subsidiary SilkAir has six of them, it gives Boeing a boost of confidence after reports of shoddy production and poor oversight at the Boeing plant in North Charleston surfaced, and following grounding of some Dreamliner jets because of problems with the Rolls Royce Trent engine fitted to the aircraft.

Read also:

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/grounding-boeing-max-and-dreamliner-planes-how-can-singapores-airlines-reassure-customers

It’s good to have friends, indeed. But while it’s not yet known if airlines such as AA and SIA have sought or will seek compensation from Boeing, others which have made known their intention include Norwegian Air Shuttle, Ryanair and the big three Chinese carriers of Air China, China Eastern Airlines and China Southern Airlines. A strongly worded report from the Chinese Global Times newspaper said: “We must use punishment and tell the Americans their practice of using concealment and fraud to extract benefits from others, while benefiting themselves, is unfair.”

Will you take a Boeing 737 MAX flight again?

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/will-you-fly-b737-max-8-jet

CAAS’ quick suspension of Boeing 737 MAX 8 a right call, but could SilkAir have done better?

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/quick-suspension-boeing-737-max-8-right-call-caas-could-silkair-have-done-better

Singapore Airlines does better without Tigerair

Courtesy Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines (SIA) reported 3Q (Oct-Dec 2017) operating profit of S$155 million (US$118 million), an increase of S$4 million or 2.6 per cent year-on-year. This adds up to a nine-month total of S$566 million compared to S$427 of the previous year, an increase of S$139 million or 32.6 per cent.

SIA can look forward a strong recovery for the full year, as the amount already exceeds last year’s S$386 million, which declined by S$99 million or 20.4 per cent.

Subsidiaries SilkAir and Scoot faced different fortune. Regional carrier SilkAir suffered a dip in operating profit of S$11 million or 36.7 per cent from S$30 million to S$19 million despite an increase in revenue and passenger carriage. Budget carrier Scoot on the other hand reported operating profit of S$43 million, an increase of S$25 million or 48.3 per cent, overtaking its sibling airline.

Courtesy Scoot

As a group (including SIA Cargo and SIA Engineering), 3Q operating profit was S$330 million – an increase of S$37 million or 12.6 per cent – in the absence of Tigerair, which incurred a S$79 million writedown of the its brand a year ago. This adds up to S$843 million for the nine months to December 2017, an increase of S$248 million or 41.7 per cent.

A challenge ahead would be rising fuel cost, which rose by S$86 million or 9.2 per cent in 3Q, fortunately cushioned by gains in hedging. SIA and SilkAir will face pressure on yields from more aggressive competition while Scoot without Tigerair may find opportunities in the low-cost trend for the longer haul and its appeal to millenials.

A Brief History of Singapore Airlines Going Forward

Courtesy Bloomberg

The history of Singapore Airlines (SIA) dates back to the incorporation of Malayan Airways on May 1, 1947. The airline changed its name to Malaysia Airways in line with the formation of Malaysia in 1963. The entity splits into SIA and Malaysian Airlines System in 1972, seven years after Singapore left the Malaysian federation and became a nation in its own right. Then on SIA expanded quickly and became one of the world’s top airlines.

SIA established Tradewinds in 1975 as a regional carrier catering mainly to the leisure market. This was SilkAir’s predecessor as the airline looked beyond into the business segment and assumed its new identity in 1976. With the growth of budget travel, SIA partnered leading budget carrier Ryanair to set up Tiger Airways which commenced services in September 2004. Tiger underwent several changes over the years, performing below expectations. In the meantime SIA set up Scoot, a fully-owned budget subsidiary said to be targeting the medium (and now long-haul) while Tiger focused on the short-haul. The line soon blurred, and by the end of 2016, Tiger was assimilated into Scoot.

As SIA expanded as it grew, so did it reconsolidate by contracting as the aviation landscape shifted. The demise of Tiger was imminent when Scoot was formed, not only to extend the range of the budget operations but also to recapture ground lost by Tiger. The intra-competition that followed did not make much sense. The costly lesson from Tiger is that it can be hard to repair a badly tarnished image and easier to start a new slate.

Now, from four down to three, will there be further restructuring of the SIA stable?

Courtesy AFP

According to OAG, an air travel intelligence agency based in the UK, Scoot has overtaken SilkAir in the number of seats offered. The budget airline is also about a third as big as SIA in the economy market. And it is growing at a faster rate than its regional sibling. Besides, parent SIA looks set to refocus on premium travel, a move that some analysts believe to favour the expansion of Scoot, particularly when the line between budget and legacy airlines begins to blur across the industry.

This does not augur well for a carrier like SilkAir operating in the middle of the field. Since its inception, the so-called regional carrier has been operating in the shadow of the parent airline and continues to do so despite recent efforts to change that image. Does this forebode a merger between SilkAir and Scoot, going forward, although the former has time and again insisted it is not a budget airline? Can Scoot on the other hand be more than a budget carrier?

What’s in a name anyway? So says the Bard, a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.

After the merger of Scoot and Tigerair, will it be Singapore Airlines and SilkAir next?

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Will Singapore Airlines (SIA) and its subsidiary SilkAir take the merger route of Scoot and Tigerair, now that their finance operations are merged, perhaps as a first step in that direction?

While SIA maintains that such initiatives are part of an ongoing programme to be more competitive, the speculation is only to be expected in the oontext of the company embarking on “a comprehensive review that leaves no stone unturned, cutting across all divisions of the company” as stated by its CEO Goh Choon Phong.

SlkAir started in 1975 as Tradewinds Charters which became Tradewinds Airlines in 1989 when scheduled services were introduced. Three years later, it was renamed SilkAir, shedding its leisure image and is often referenced as SIA’s regional arm.

However, in its long history, SilkAir hardly comes into its own, seen as operating in the shadow of parent SIA. Therefore, consolidating operations – finance, for a start – makes sense since some of the routes operated by SilkAir were previously operated by SIA and in light of SIA re-focussing its operations in the region. Besides, as the competition intensifies, a strong SIA brand across the region is imperative. There is no reason why a regional carrier so-called should be viewed as one providing services one notch below, an unfortunate perception that is difficult to shed.

At the height of the budget travel boom in the region, SIA launched Tigerair in 2003. Then there were already questions asked about the continuing operations of SilkAir which the company reiterated is a regional airline and not a budget carrier. Then Scoot came into being in 2012 as a medium haul budget carrier, differentiated from Tigerair’s short haul operations. It soon became clear the SIA Group was having one too many on its plate, resulting in intra-competition. Tigerair and Scoot finally merged under the Scoot brand this year.

Now that the number has been trimmed from four to three, will it be cut down further to two, typically the structure of most global airlines, between full-service and low-cost operations?

SilkAir may be likened to Cathay Dragonair, which Cathay Pacific has also insisted is not a budget but regional airline. But then, Cathay has never believed in adding a budget carrier under its wings. You might say that place is filled by Dragonair. By comparison, however, SilkAir’s status is somewhat ambiguous depending on how SIA delineates the geography as being regional or international.