Can Jewel Changi Airport continue to shine, for both Singaporeans and foreign travellers?

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/can-jewel-changi-airport-continue-shine-both-singaporeans-and-foreign-travellers

(Courtesy of TODAY)

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Skytrax Best Airports 2019: No surprises

Generally the Skytrax list of top ten airports does not surprise. It’s very much the same again this year, with the airlines staying in the same rank or switching positions one up or down. Frankfurt Airport is the ony one to drop out of the list, replaced by Tokyo Narita.

Courtesy Changi Airport

Singapore Changi wins hands down, a record seven years. With continuing construction of new facilities and upgrading works, it is one hard to beat. Changi pampers the travellers, and respondents give it top honours for leisure amenities. But it is ranked behind Seoul Incheon and the Japanese airports of Tokyo Narita, Tokyo Haneda and Centrair Nagoya for airport staff service. It is also second to Seoul Incheon for international transit.

Worthy of note is again the absence of North American airports but the rising popularity of Japanese airports. No surprise that Tokyo Haneda and Centrair Nagoya are the two cleanest, with Tokyo Narita and Kansai also in the list. Doha Hamad International is the only Middle East airport in the top ten, and you may ask where is Dubai International as the world’s busiest airport. The list is generally dominated by Asian airports, but European airports have managed to maintain some presence in the top ranks: Munich (7th), London Heathrow (8th) and Zurich (10th).

The modern airport is today more than a mere transportation centre facilitating movement from one place to another, but a metropolis in its own right as airports compete to keep the numbers coming. Shopping for example is an important feature, for which London Heathrow wins the day. So too is dining, for which Hong Kong is a consistent winner.

The form impresses, but it is empty if not supported by substance. The basics are still important, such as baggage delivery which according to the survey is best provided by Kansai.

A new category introduced this year – best website and digital services – sees the mention of an American winner: entity: Houston Airports System. By he way, Houston George Bush is ranked fifth for dining. So there is hope, America!

Qantas considers “crazy” ideas for ultra-long flight

Courtesy Reuters

Qantas is taking the lead in raising the bar for the ultra-long flight. And it is understandable why. The Australian flag carrier will be launching the world’s longest flight from Sydney to London in 2022 – a journey of 20 hours and 20 minutes.

Qantas is already flying non-stop from Perth to London, but the flight (17 hours and 20 minutes) is shorter than Qatar Airways’ 18-hour flight from Doha to Auckland and Singapore Airlines (SIA)’s flight from Singapore to New York (closer to 19 hours).

However, not many people may think staying up in the air for that long a time is the best way to travel. So the task for Qantas is to shift that mindset. According to the airline, their Perth-London experience has shown that health and wellness are the main concerns of passengers, and these may be translated into “comfort, sleep, dining, entertainment, and state of mind”.

The package goes beyond providing more comfortable seating, noise-reduced headsets and food specially designed to help the body adjust to the journey.

The limited space of the aircraft’s pressurized cabins and its complete lack of view pose a big challenge. So pre-flight programs become an option.

Qantas has introduced a lounge at Perth International with ‘light therapy’ showers, hydration menus and yoga classes to reduce the effects of jetlag. But this facility is only open to customers travelling in business, gold, platinum and platinum one Frequent Flyers, Oneworld emerald and sapphire customers, and Qantas Club members and their guests.

What about the rest of the travelers who are travelling in economy? These are the passengers who probably need more convincing than premium passengers. Unless, as in the case of SIA’s Singapore to Newark flight which offers only business and premium class seats (there again, certain privileges may not apply to the lower class).

That said, what really matters is what happens on the flight. According to a Qantas study, suggestions include common spaces for stretching (now there’s the rule about not conglomerating), a cafe and stand-bar (which is not new even for the long-haul), exercise bikes and guided meditations.

Think cruise, as it were, although that’s not quite a fair comparison. But they all seem to be saying: If you can’t sleep through the flight or enjoy the view outside, and when you are tired after watching several movies or getbleary-eyed reading, you want to be doing something else or simply to get out of your seat.

Qantas said it is thinking outside the box and considering some “crazy” ideas. That will certainly change the flying experience, cost aside. It may mean the return of luxury air travel at least for the ultra-long haul.

But it is a strategic investment for the flying kangaroo “because of where Australia is situated on the globe,” said Phil Capps, head of customer experience. He added, “we’ve always had to push the boundaries of long-haul flying to ensure our passengers arrive at their destination ready for the next stage of their journey.”

While more airlines are battling it out in the long and ultra-long haul arena, the real competitor for Qantas may be SIA since there may still be many travelers who prefer to break their journey and because Singapore Changi Airport is the indisputable airport for transiting. The corollary is that SIA will be equally challenged to keep them coming through Changi.

How Changi Airport can attract more visitors, not just air travellers

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/how-changi-airport-can-attract-more-visitors-not-just-air-travellers

Singapore Airlines spreads its wings wider across the US

Courtesy Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines (SIA)’s catchy “seamless to Seattle” byline echoes the popular Hollywood movie title “Sleepless in Seattle” starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan as it announces plans to launch a non-stop service to the Washington state gateway in north western USA. Flight time is estimated at 16 hours 30 minutes. Mark the date: 3 September 2019.

Seattle will be SIA’s fifth US city in the airline’s network after San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York and Houston. It is also the fourth city to be served non-stop from Singapore. Houston is served via Manchester in the United Kingdom (UK), the first connection between the US and the UK for the airline, which has historically been fighting hard to secure rights to cross the pond from Britain; its initial interest was to fly from London to New York.

Clearly the Singapore carrier is spreading its wings wider across the US. Based on current schedules, the Seattle service will increase SIA’s operations to 57 flights weekly. In the early days, the airline also flew to Honolulu; today, that destination is served by its budget subsidiary Scoot.

Strategically, SIA is well placed in the major hub cities, serving almost the four corners of the US. Seattle is a good bet as a western gateway into the heart of the US, particularly when it can also leverage on the wide network of Alaska Airlines in their partnership. Seattle is also a hop away from Vancouver in western Canada which SIA used to serve but may now use Seattle as the alternative.

At home, Changi Airport’s hub status will be enhanced by SIA’s success to channel traffic through the airport to regional destinations.

As SIA pushes more into the US, you may wonder which other cities are also on its radar. Will it be Chicago next? Too early to think about it? Not quite, in this business. And if you think Seattle is some ten months away, according to the SIA website, flights will be available for booking from 18 November 2018.

Qantas is changing the game

Courtesy Getty Images

After the successful launch of the non-stop Perth-to-London flight in March, Qantas is now working on plans to introduce a non-stop Sydney-to-London flight, which is expected to take a little more than 20 hours. Boeing and Airbus have been invited to retrofit an aircraft that will fly the distance, and Qantas CEO Alan Joyce expected a launch by 2020.

This is set to be a game changer, continuing the momentum set by the Perth non-stop which, according to the Australian flag carrier, is performing well, and in fact, exceeding expectations. Mr Joyce himself said early signs were positive, and that the new route “is the highest rating service on our network.”

The task now is how to make the ultra-long haul comfortable enough to influence the pattern of travel and get non-believers on board. According to the Independent, a Twitter poll with over 1,200 responses showed that 40 per cent would prefer a non-stop flight, 30 per cent would want a break in the journey, and the remaining 30 per cent said it would depend on the fare.

“We’re challenging ourselves to think outside the box,” said Mr Joyce. “Would you have the space used for other activities – exercise, bar, creche, sleeping areas and berths?”

Maybe think, along the line of a cruise?

One suggestion put forth was converting the plane’s cargo hold into sleeping pods.

With more non-stop ultra-long haul flights from Australia – Perth now, Sydney next and most likely Melbourne to follow suit – to London and possibly other European destinations such as Paris and Athens (and further down the road to key destinations in Africa and the Americas as well), how will this affect the competition?

The Kangaroo Route has been a lucrative route for Qantas and rivals that include Singapore Airlines (SIA) and Middle East carriers, notably Emirates Airlines (despite its alliance with Qantas), Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways, flying via their home airports. Even Cathay Pacific may be counted as a veritable competitor.

However, these airlines are themselves also operating the ultra-long haul, so they are not unaware of how the game may be changing. Take, for example, the Middle East: Emirates, Etihad and Qatar are all operating non-stop to Los Angeles, albeit from their different home airports of Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Doha respectively, in close proximity, and this is besides Saudi Arabian Airlines (Saudia) flying from Jeddah. Both Emirates and Qatar are also flying non-stop to Auckland.

Asian rivals Cathay Pacific and Philippines airlines both fly non-stop from New York to Hong Kong and Manila respectively, and will soon be joined by SIA connecting the Big Apple with Singapore. Cathay and Philippines are also competing on the non-stop option from Toronto, while SIA and United Airlines are taking on each other flying non-stop between San Francisco and Singapore.

Perhaps to the relief of Qantas, British Airways (BA) has expressed no interest in mounting non-stop flights between Australia and the UK. In fact, over the years, BA has reduced its interest in Australia, currently operating only one service from London to Sydney via Singapore.

It seems that the ultra-long haul aims at narrowing the rivalry on key routes where point-to-point traffic is the target, and is perhaps also an attempt to claim native rights, cutting out third parties jumping on the bandwagon. The question is whether there is adequate traffic to justify the operations.

The fortunes of some airlines may shift, so too those of some airports which rely on transit traffic with no real attraction other than being a convenient stop en route. One only needs to look back at how Bahrain Airport quickly lost its status when new technologically advanced aircraft able to fly a longer distance without refuelling emerged on the horizon.

Dubai International and Singapore Changi are two popular hubs on the Kangaroo Route. How will their fortunes change?

Yes, they may lose some traffic with Qantas flying direct from Perth, Sydney and Melbourne, but all is not lost so long as there continues to be up to 70 per cent of travellers who are yet convinced the ultra-long haul is the way to fly. The airlines themselves understand the dynamics, hence the dual strategy, offering the options. Qantas may reduce some flights, but it is unlikely to completely stop flying via Dubai or Singapore. Similarly, SUA will not cease making a stop at an Asian port just because it has introduced non-stop flights to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Again, if one sees how Dubai International does what Bahrain could not do, reviving the importance of a Middle East hub with convenient connections to Europe and Africa, no less owing to the vast network of Emirates, and how Changi has enticed transit and transfer passengers with being more than just another airport, one can be hopeful of their future. They may even flourish as important regional hubs, feeding traffic from and into the ultra-long haul flights.

And don’t forget, non-stop flights cost more. People spend their dollar in different ways.

Time to get tough on unruly airline passengers

https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/time-get-tough-unruly-airline-passengers