Air France to “boost” performance with new low-cost carrier

Legacy airlines in Europe have long been feeling the pinch from low-cost carriers such as Ryanair and Easyjet. Now it looks like Norwegian Air Shuttle and WOW Air are pushing them to look farther before they lose more ground.
Lufthansa already offers a low-cost trans-Atlantic option from Europe to Las Vegas, Orlando, Miami and Seattle in the United States.

The International Airlines Group which owns British Airways, Iberia, Aer Lingusm and Vueling has just added another low-cost carrier – Level – to its stable. Level, based in Barcelona, will fly to Los Angeles and Oakland in California USA, Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic, and Buenos Aires in Argentina. Fares start at the familiar €99 reminiscent of the Norwegian and WOW Air’s promotions.

Courtesy Air France

Following in their footsteps is Air France, which announces the formation of a new subsidiary low-cost airline – Boost as its working name – planned to commence operations in winter. The airline will fly from the main hubs of the Air France/KLM group to destinations in Italy, Spain and Turkey initially, and then farther to destinations in Asia. Norwegian is already flying to Bangkok and will in October connect London with Singapore.

But Boost will be taking on full-service airlines as well, such as the Middle East carriers of Emirates Airlines, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways which are already ruffling the feathers of the regional big birds of Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific.

The developments point to a gradual convergence of the low-cost and full-service product perceived value wise. It’s the antithetical success of low-cost carriers pushing to bridge the gulf and the failure of legacy airlines not being able to maintain if not increase the differentiation. It looks like the European tug-of-war is pulling the legacy airlines towards the centre line.

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Budget and transatlantic competition heat up

Courtesy Vueling Airlines

Courtesy Vueling Airlines

International Airlines Group (IAG) announced plans to commence low-cost transatlantic flights from Barcelona to the United States by budget carrier Vueling. IAG also owns British Airways (BA), Iberia and Aer Lingus.

Legacy airlines (and airline groups) are increasingly recognizing the competition posed by budget carriers, and it is not new that some of them have set up budget operations such as Lufthansa’s Eurowings, Qantas’ Jetstar, and Singapore Airlines’ Scoot. In the US, the Big Three airlines of American, United and Delta are introducing no-frills fares on normal services to compete with low-cost counterparts such as Southwest, JetBlue and Frontier.

Where the competition is most felt is the transatlantic sector, which has seen a surge of cheap fares offered by operators such as Norwegian Air Shuttle and Iceland’s WOW Air, discomforting both US and European counterparts.

WOW Air is well-known for its $99 fare for travel between the US and Europe – destinations such as Copenhagen, Stockholm, Edinburgh and Bristol – with a free stopover in Reykjavik. It has begun enticing US Westcoasters with fares as low as $65.

Norwegian also offers $99 fares with promotional offers as low as $69.

Budget doyen Ryanair has long announced its ambition to also ply the transatlantic routes.

While home-based US airlines are protesting the entry of Norwegian, European airlines are taking a more active approach to compete head-on. IAG will be able to advantage Vueling with the network of partner airlines. Eurowings is already operating nonstop from Cologne and Bonn to the US, and it has plans to add more destinations.

In a price-sensitive market for as long as the current situation holds, budget carriers may be driving the trend. Legacy airlines will be challenged to make their advertised difference in product worth the additional dollars in fares, at the same time keeping their budget rivals at bay in a two-prong approach to the competition.

No more free meals for BA short haul

BA4 courtesy BA.jpg

Courtesy British Airways

British Airways (BA) will stop catering complimentary meals on domestic and short-haul flights. Passengers may avail themselves of food and drink supplied by supermarket chain Marks & Spencer at a cost, and we all know that such meals don’t come cheap.

BA said the decision was made to cut costs, and this naturally was not well received by its customers. It is coming at a time when BA is making record profits compared to its regional competitors, picking up a trend set by North American carriers although ironically some of them such as Delta Air Lines are considering re-introducing meals as the competition intensifies.

The question is: Will BA lower its airfare as a consequence? Increasingly airlines are adopting the no-frill model to boost their coffers with ancillary revenue which has been rising significantly in recent years. But that is at the risk of losing the differentiation that makes full-service airlines a conscious choice of travellers who are prepared to foot more for it. It is good news otherwise for low-cost operators such as Ryanair, Norwegian Air Shuttle and Wow Air.

BA is testing the ground. Its success will depend on how strong it is as a trendsetter, and its understanding of the compliance of the travelling public, however prone they are to complaining. Right now, BA has muscled itself into an extensive network of airlines under the International Airlines Group (IAG) that also owns Iberia, Vueling and Aer Lingus. Time will tell.

Enter the ultra-budget airline

Courtesy NewLeaf

Courtesy NewLeaf

LESS than a month after Canada’s latest carrier Airlines revealed plans to offer ultra-low fares operating from its base in Winnipeg to six cities within the country, namely Abbotsford, Halifax, Hamilton, Kelowna, Regina, and Saskatoon, it announced it was “temporarily postponing service” and would refund all transactions already made. The first service was to be launched in February.

Newleaf’s fate now rests in the hands of the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) which is reviewing the carrier’s aviation licence. Apparently Newleaf was selling seats through a charter arrangement with Kelowna-based Flair Airlines Ltd which held the CTA operating licence. The question is whether the indirect Newleaf should itself be holding a licence directly.

Newleaf CEO Jim Young’s reaction was one of optimism. He said: “We welcome a regulatory system in which businesses like ours can thrive in Canada as they do in other countries.”

That aside, the ultra-budget airline that is sometimes referred to as a discount airline is not an entirely new phenomenon. In his somewhat premature announcement of the launch of the airline, Young said: “Lower landing fees mean we have savings we can pass on to you.” The key word is “affordability”. According to him, “Ultra low-cost carriers are some of the most financially successful airlines in the world today.”

Young may be referring to operators such as Iceland’s WOW Air and the longer haul Norwegian Air Shuttle. WOW Air, for example, is offering US$99 fares connecting Boston and San Francisco in the US with the Icelandic capital Reykjavik. It is next looking at connecting with Montreal and Toronto in Canada.

While you might remind Young of how as many airlines so-called budget too have come and gone, Newleaf is already expressing interest to expand its operations to other destinations within Canada and in the United States.

Young, who was at one time CEO of Frontier Airlines, explained: “By unbundling the entire service you get to choose what you want.” That basically is the budget model, and one that is further trimmed down on costs. As an example, he cited how NewLeaf would be able to save money in part because it does not offer its seats on any third-party travel websites, which charge airlines a fee to post and make sales there. Considering the nature of its operations, that makes economic sense. After all, Young did not see Canada’s two other major carriers – Air Canada and Westjet – as Newleaf’s competitors. He said: “If I had a competitor, it would be the airlines that Canadians are driving across the border for.” He was referring to Canada’s loss of market share to US airlines such as Allegiant Air operating out of airports south of the border, close enough for Canadians to drive across to take advantage of the lower fares.

Young added: “We’re looking to create a new market and stimulate people who aren’t flying today. What I’m going after are people that will make the three-and-a-half hour drive in the middle of winter to go to Grand Forks because they’ve got to get to some place warm or can’t afford to fly from here.”

That argument about developing new market has been the slogan of many a budget upstart, and which has contributed to the success of some of them to go where the full service airlines would not go. Newleaf is therefore targeting a limited but niche leisure market on the back of a strategy that focuses on second-tier airports. It can count on that as a strength to drive its growth, particularly at a time when it could take advantage of the current low fuel costs. Too many no-frill operators in the past had been hit badly by soaring oil prices. The challenge for Newleaf will come when other upstarts similarly motivated jump into the same arena, or when one of the legacy airlines decide that the market has grown big enough for them to join the competition most probably through a subsidiary offshoot such as Rouge, the budget arm of Air Canada.

Legacy airlines across the world have become increasingly wary of the growth of the budget carriers, particularly after the 2008 global economic crisis when air travel trended downwards to cheaper fares. Budget carriers are now competing in the same market, not only for seats in the traditional economy class but also for travellers who want some perks but at lower fares as they introduce their version of business class. North American domestic operations by the major airlines are already adopting the budget model to charge for meals and baggage among a slew of chargeable.

The temptation of growing bigger than intended is always present. This unbridled ambition has led to the downfall of many operators in aviation history, perhaps the reason why the doyen of the budget model Ryanair remains undecided whether it should launch long haul services across the Atlantic, and why some discount carriers such as Allegiant have stayed small. Will Newleaf, when granted the licence to operate, given its ambition to expand far and wide, go down this same road?

Perhaps not, as it would appear that the current budget model exemplified by carriers such as Ryanair and easyJet is not trim enough, and if lower cost will stimulate demand, there is room for Newleaf to grow. Yet one begins to wonder how much lower you can go.

This article was first published in Aspire Aviation.